PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 9/4/2000

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game.

The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Thanks to Henryk Kalafut, Paul Cheng, Federico Giallombardo and Olivier Scalbert. 
THIS WEEK

POSITION 135

White to play & DRAW

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/2p5/8/4PK2/7b/8/8/2k5: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 134

Sergey Belavyenets (1910-1941). Talented Soviet master and theoretician who twice won the Moscow championship (1937 and 1938). In 1939 he had his best result when he came 3rd in the USSR championship. He was killed in the Second World War.

Belavyenets vs Rauzer

Moscow, 1937

White to play & WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:4b3/p6p/1p1k2pP/1P1p1pP1/P2K1P2/4P1N1/8/8: 

In middlegame situations the isolated d-pawn can be a form of strength especially when combined with active piece play. As the pieces are exchanged, its downside becomes more noticeable. Here it is a weakness with the pawn on the same colour as the Bishop which is tied to its passive defence. This is a a classic good Knight vs bad Bishop ending. White has the threat of sacrificing his Knight on the kingside creating a passed pawn or taking his Knight to Nb4->Nc6 threatening to win the weak a-pawn.

1.Ne2 Bd7

2.Nc3 Be6

3.Na2 Bf7

3...Bc8 4.Nb4 Bb7 5.Nd3 Bc8 6.Ne5 and then 7.Nxg6 wins.

4.Nb4 Be6

5.Nc6 a5

5...Bc8 6.Nxa7 Bd7 7.Kd3! +-

6.bxa6 Kxc6

7.a7!...

7.Ke5? Bc8 8.a7 Bb7 9.Kf6 Kd6 10.Kg7 Ke7 11.Kxh7 Kf7=

7.... Kb7 8.Ke5 Bd7 9.Kf6 Bxa4 10.Kg7 b5 11.Kxh7 b4 12.Kxg6 b3 13.h7 Be8+ 14.Kf6 b2 15.h8Q b1Q 16.a8Q+ Kxa8 17.Qxe8+

White wins the Queen ending easily.


Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. In case of a tie for 1st place, the prize will be shared. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

Easter Endgame Solving Tournament starts on Sunday  16th April.


Federico Giallombardo of Italy wins in March.

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION  

 
ARCHIVES

2/4/00

Position 133

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