PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 30/7/2000

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Henryk Kalafut and Federico Giallombardo.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 151 

White to play and WIN.

FORSYTH NOTATION:1N6/5P2/p4r1b/8/8/8/8/K6k: 


 LAST WEEK, POSITION 150

  Jose Capablanca, (1888-1942). World Champion 1921-1927. The 1914 St. Petersburg tournament was a great success for the Cuban genius who had gone through the preliminary stage without losing a single game. In contrast to Capa's triumph of winning the peliminary, Rubinstein, who until then was looked upon as a challenger to the World title, could not score enough points to make it to the final. Emanuel Lasker, the reigning World Champion came good in the last stage to win with 13.5 points followed by Capa with 13 points. The Cuban had made it clear to the World that he was Lasker's new challenger.

Rubinstein vs Capablanca

St. Petersburg, 1914

Black to play and DRAW

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:6k1/1q3pp1/p7/2Q5/1p5P/2P1P3/P4PP1/6K1: 

White has just made the mistake of taking the pawn on c5? (Qd6xc5). If he had instead played 1. c4! he would have blunted Blacks counterattack on the queenside. Rubinstein would have winning chances because he has a pawn advantage and his King is secure from checks. Black now obtains a strong passed pawn which forces White to seek a draw by perpetual check. Sometimes this is the only defence available in a Q+P ending when the other side has an advanced pawn.

1...bxc3!

2.Qxc3 Qb1+

3.Kh2 Qxa2

The Black a-pawn now becomes very important.

4.Qc8+ Kh7

5.Qf5+ g6

6.Qf6 a5

How is this pawn to be stopped?

7.g4 ...

Black draws after 7.h5 gxh5 8.Qg5 (8.Qf5+ Kg7 9.Qg5+ Kf8 10.Qd8+ Kg7= )8...Qxf2 9.Qxh5+ Kg7 10.Qg5+ Kf8 11.Qd8+ Kg7=.

7. ... a4

White is now forced to break up Black's pawn defence to get a draw by perpetual check.

8.h5 gxh5

Black draws after 8...a3 9.h6! Qb2! (But not 9... Kxh6?? 10.Qh8+ Kg5 11.Kg3! +-) 10.Qxf7+ Kxh6 11.Qf8+ Kh7 12.Qe7+ Kg8 13.Qe8+ Kg7=.

9.Qf5+ Kg7

10.Qg5+ Kh7

10...Kf8 11.Qd8+ Kg7 12.Qg5+ with a draw.

11.Qxh5+ Kg7

12.Qg5+

White has to take the draw. The a-pawn is too powerful. A wonderful example of the Cuban's skill in a difficult ending.

The next round of the endgame solving tournament will start on Sunday 27th August.


Mike Fitch (USA) wins in June.

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION   
Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. In case of a tie for 1st place, the prize will be shared. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

Easter Endgame Solving Tournament:

Click here >> Solutions + names of winners


ARCHIVES

23/7/00

Position 149

Berger

16/7/00

Position 148

Tarjan

9/7/00

Position 147

Reek

2/7/00

Position 146

Barden

25/6/00

Position145

Bron

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Position144

Fine (2)

11/6/00

Position 143

Frolovsky

4/6/00

Position142

Euwe (3)

28/5/00

Position 141

Nadareishvili

21/5/00

Position 140

Konstantinopolsky

14/5/00

Position 139

Vancura

7/5/00

Position 138

Capablanca (2)
Pre 7/5/00 Archives

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