PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 13/8/2000

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Henryk Kalafut, Olivier Scalbert and Federico Giallombardo.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 153

White to play and WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:4K3/4P3/7k/8/2B4P/8/8/7r: 


LAST WEEK, POSITION 152

Mikhail Botvinnik, (1911-1995). World Champion 1948-57, 1958-1960, 1961-63. The 13th Soviet Championship (1944) was a major triumph for Botvinnik who won by a two point margin ahead of Smyslov. Despite the War, Soviet chess was on the up and would soon reach world dominance with Botvinnik winning the World Championship in 1948. The 1940's was Botvinnik's golden period; winning seven successive tournaments which included three Soviet Championships.

Botvinnik vs Flohr

Moscow, 1944

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/1p3k2/p4ppp/3P4/1P6/4K2P/1P4P1/8:

The game had been adjourned a few moves before this position occured. In his home analysis Botvinnik worked out that this ending was good for White. Flohr allowed the ending to be reached thinking it was drawn. The important positional plus for White is the passed d-pawn. White's double pawns on the queenside are not a weakness in this ending.

1.g4! ...

This prevents both ...f5 and ...h5. White is seeking to invade his opponents camp via f5.

1...Ke7

2.h4 Kd6

3.Ke4 b6

3...h5 4.gxh5 gxh5 5.Kf5 Kxd5 6.Kxf6 Kd4 7.Kg6 Ke4 8. Kxh5 Kf5 9. Kh6 Kf6 10. h5 b6 Crafty (Olivier Scalbert).

4.h5 gxh5

4...f5+? 5.gxf5,gxh5 6.f6 is a win for White because the enemy King is tied to guarding the passed pawns.

5.gxh5 a5

6.Kf5...

6.bxa5 bxa5 7.b3,Kc5 8.Kf5,Kxd5 9.Kxf6 ~ would win with only one tempo as White queens first, covering a1.

6.... axb4

7.Kxf6 Kxd5

8.Kg6 Ke6

9.Kxh6 Kf6

10.b3 Kf7

10...b5 11.Kh7 Kf7 12.h6 Kf8 13.Kg6 Kg8 14.Kf5 +-.

11.Kg5 Kg7 12.Kf5 Kh6 13.Ke5 Kxh5 14.Kd5 Kg5 15.Kc6 Kf5

16.Kxb6 Ke6 17.Kc5 Kd7 18.Kxb4 Kc6 19.Ka5 and White wins.

One of Botvinnik's great endings. He knew how important it was to gain mastery in this area of chess and realized early in his career the importance of home analysis. He finely tuned this into a deadly weapon that helped to take him to Caissa's throne.

The next round of the endgame solving tournament will start on Sunday 27th August.


 
Henryk Kalafut (USA) wins in July

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION   
Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. In case of a tie for 1st place, the prize will be shared. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.

Easter Endgame Solving Tournament:

Click here >> Solutions + names of winners


ARCHIVES

6/8/00

Position 151

Havasi (2)

30/7/00

Position 150

Capablanca (4)

23/7/00

Position 149

Berger

16/7/00

Position 148

Tarjan

9/7/00

Position 147

Reek

2/7/00

Position 146

Barden

25/6/00

Position145

Bron

18/6/00

Position144

Fine (2)

11/6/00

Position 143

Frolovsky

4/6/00

Position142

Euwe (3)

28/5/00

Position 141

Nadareishvili

21/5/00

Position 140

Konstantinopolsky

14/5/00

Position 139

Vancura

7/5/00

Position 138

Capablanca (2)
Pre 7/5/00 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS