PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 10/9/2000

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Henryk Kalafut and Olivier Scalbert.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 157

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:3q4/6Pk/1p6/4NNP1/1pK2p2/8/2P5/8:


 LAST WEEK, POSITION 156

Paul Keres, (1916-1975). Estonian and Soviet Grandmaster. World Championship Candidate. After World War II, Keres became a Soviet citizen due to Estonia being returned to the USSR. He won the Soviet Championship three times: 1947, 1950 and 1951 and was runner up in the Candidate tournaments of 1953, 1956 and 1962. In the 1948 Soviet Championship Keres was not in his best form, finishing =6th, but he did produce this memorable ending: 

Keres vs Levenfish

Soviet Ch, 1948 

White to play and WIN

  FORSYTH NOTATION :3r4/8/5kp1/6p1/1P2R1P1/4K3/8/8:

White showed good technique in the early part of the Rook ending by cutting off the Black King from the passed b-pawn to reach this winning postion.

1.b5 Rb8

Blacks Rook is forced to take up a passive position to stop the b-pawn.

2.Rb4 Ke5

3.b6 Kd5

3...Rb7 4.Rb5+ Kd6 5.Rxg5 with a win.

4.b7 Kc5

5.Rb1 ...

5.Rb2 Kc4 6.Rc2+ Kd5 7.Rc7 Re8+ 8.Kf3 Rb8 9. Rh7 Kc4 10. Re7 Kd3 11. Rg7+- Crafty (Olivier Scalbert).

5...Re8+

6.Kd3 Rd8+

7.Kc3 Rb8

8.Rb2!...

A waiting move.

8... Kd5

If Black plays to capture the b-pawn the resulting pawn ending is won for White.

9.Rb4!...

9.Rb5+? Ke4 10.Kc4 Kf3=

9... Kc5

10.Kb3 Kd5

11.Rb5+! Ke4

11...Kc6 12.Kc4+-.

12.Ka4! Kf3

13.Rb4 Rxb7

Black decides his only chance is to sacrifice his Rook to gain a passed pawn but White's King can get back in time. One has to admire Keres for calculating this ending accurately over the board.

14.Rxb7 Kxg4 15.Kb3 Kf3 16.Kc3 g4 17.Kd2 g3 (17...Kf2 18.Rf7+ wins) 18.Ke1 Kg2 19.Rg7 Resigns.

Levenfish showed that he could be magnanimous in defeat by including this ending, with Keres extensive notes, in a book he coauthored with Smyslov about Rook endings. Keres own book, Practical Chess Endings (1974), curiously makes no reference to it, but both books are good reading material for any serious student of the endgame.

Next weeks position will appear on MONDAY 18th September at approx 21:00 HRS.


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 Paul Cheng(China) wins in August.

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION   
Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. In case of a tie for 1st place, the prize will be shared. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


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