PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 29/10/2000

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore and Henryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 164

Black to play and WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION :8/4r1p1/kpp1r3/p2p1p1p/P1nP4/1RPKPPPP/3B4/1R6:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 163

Hermann Keidanski, (1865-?). Chess Writer and Endgame Composer. Came to New York from Europe in 1902 and was soon involved with chess promotion. Changed his name to Keidanz. Wrote a monograph on the Rice Gambit(1905) and edited an important book on Eugene Cook(1927) who was one of American's first great composers.

Keidanz, 1904

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION :6q1/8/1K6/8/4NQ2/b7/8/7k:

White cannot mate the enemy monarch directly because of the presence of the Black Queen guarding key squares. The winning method is to drive the King towards its own partner so that it becomes exposed to a tactical device such as a skewer or a fork. The White King plays a very important silent role because it stops the enemy monarch from running away to the top left hand corner of the board. The Black King can avoid skewers along the diagonals and ranks but will have great difficulty avoiding a deadly Knight fork.

1.Ng3+ Kh2

2.Qh4+ Kg2

3.Qh1+ Kf2

4.Qf1+ Ke3

White is making progress. The Black King is driven out into the open and towards its own Queen.

5.Qe2+ Kd4

5...Kf4 6.Nh5+ Kf5 7.Qf3+ Kg6 8.Qg4+ Kf7 9.Qf5+ Ke7 10.Qf6+ Ke8 11.Ng7+ Kd7 12.Qc6+ Ke7 13.Nf5+ Kf8 14.Qc8+ Kf7 15.Nh6+ White wins.

6.Qd2+ Ke5

7.Qe3+ Kf6

7...Kd6 8.Qd4+ Ke7 9.Nf5+ Ke8 10.Qa4+wins.

8.Nh5+ Kg6

9. Qg3+ Kf7 10. Qb3+ Kf8 11. Qxa3+ Kf7 12. Qf3+ Kg6 13. Qg4+ Kf7 14. Qf5+ Ke7 15. Qf6+ Kd7 16. Qc6+ Ke7 17. Qc5+ Kf7 18. Qd5+ Kf8 19. Qd6+ Kf7 20. Qf6+ Ke8 21. Ng7+ Kd7 22. Qc6+Ke7 23. Nf5+ Kf7 24. Nh6+ White wins.

A wonderful example of how well the Queen and Knight can combine together in a pawnless ending.


Antonio Senatore (ARGENTINA) and Alexander Vojna (UKRAINE ) win the Summer Endgame Tournament

click here>> Solutions and Results


 

* Federico Giallombardo wins in September *

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION   
Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. In case of a tie for 1st place, the prize will be shared. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


ARCHIVES

22/10/00

Position 162

Nimzowitsch

15/10/00

Position 161

Korolkov

08/10/00

Position 160

Stahlberg

01/10/00

Position 159

Mattison (2)

24/9/00

Position158

Simagin

17/9/00

Position 157

Kasantsev

10/9/00

Position156

Keres

3/9/00

Position 155

Guy

27/8/00

Position 154

Lisitsin

20/8/00

Position 153

Benko

13/8/00

Position 152

Botvinnik (2)

6/8/00

Position 151

Havasi (2)

30/7/00

Position 150

Capablanca (4)

23/7/00

Position 149

Berger

16/7/00

Position 148

Tarjan

9/7/00

Position 147

Reek

2/7/00

Position 146

Barden

25/6/00

Position145

Bron

18/6/00

Position144

Fine (2)

11/6/00

Position 143

Frolovsky

4/6/00

Position142

Euwe (3)

28/5/00

Position 141

Nadareishvili

21/5/00

Position 140

Konstantinopolsky

14/5/00

Position 139

Vancura

7/5/00

Position 138

Capablanca (2)
Pre 7/5/00 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS