PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 12/11/2000

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this acti:ve site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Graham White. and Olivier Scalbert.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 166

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION :8/1pnn4/p2k2p1/P2Ppp2/1P2P1BP/3KB3/8/8:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 165

Vasily (1881-1952) and Mikhail Platov, (1883-1938).

Latvian/Soviet Endgame Composers. The Platov brothers started composing independently of each other but by 1905 they were working as a team. Vasily was the most creative in the composing duo but they both needed each other for their talent to flourish. They were pioneers along with Troitsky, Kubbel and Rinck of a new emerging art form in chess, that of composing endgame studies with its own rules and competitions. Their compositions were of a high order. They built on earlier work but also made new discoveries in the field of endgame theory. They wrote together: 'Selection of Chess Studies' (Sbornik shakhmatnykh etyudov, 1928). Mikhail died in 1938 in the gulag as a result of tragic circumstances; a victim of Stalin Terror. Vasily, distraught over the loss of his brother, never composed again.

V & M Platov,

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION :8/2Rp1r2/2p5/1k2P3/3K1p2/8/3P4/8:

This ending was awarded first prize in a Czech endgame composing tourney. White has an important pin on the d-pawn which he exploits in order to promote his advanced pawn.

1.e6 Rf6

1...Rf8 2.Rxd7 f3 3.Rb7+ Ka6 4.Rf7 Rd8+ 5.Kc5 Rxd2 6.e7 Re2 7.Kxc6+-;

2.Rb7+!...

Taking the pawn leads to a draw: 2.exd7? Rd6+ 3.Ke5 Rxd7 4.Ke6 f3 5.Rc8 Re2+ 6.Kd6 Rd2+ 7.Kc7 c5 8.d8Q Rxd8 9.c4=;

2... Ka6

2...Ka4? 3.exd7 Rd6+ 4.Kc5 Rxd2 5.Rb4++-;

2...Ka5? 3.exd7 Rd6+ 4.Kc5+-;

3.exd7 ...

White ignores the threat on his Rook and goes for a powerful passed d-pawn.

3...Rd6+

This is the only reasonable reply.

3...Rf8? 4.Rc7 Rd8 5.Kc5 f3 6.Kd6 f2 7.Rxc6+ and the Rook can stop the f-pawn promoting;

4.Kc5 Rxd2

5.Rb2! ...

White offers his Rook again. This move is very important in the understanding of the study. White begins a manoeuvre to gain control of the third rank. The reason for this only becomes obvious later. 5.Rb3? only draws because of 5...f3 6.Rxf3 Kb7=;

5...Rd3!

5...Rxd7? Kxc6 wins;

5...Rxb2? 6.d8Q Rc2+ 7.Kb4 Rb2+ 8.Kc4 Rb5 9.Qc7 wins;

5...Rd1? 6.Kxc6 Rc1+ 7.Kd6 Rd1+ 8.Kc7 Rc1+ 9.Kd8 f3 10.Rd2! wins;

6.Rb3! ...

This is the key to the study. In order to win White must control the third rank. 6.Kxc6? throws away the win, 6....Rc3+ 7. Kd6 Rd3+ 8. Ke7 (8. Kc7 Rc3+ 9.Kd8 Re3!=) 8... Re3+ 9. Kf7 Rd3 10. Ke7 Re3+ 11. Kd8 f3 and draws because White cannot make any progress. The Rook checks on the third rank will save the day for Black.

6....Rd2

7.Kxc6 Rc2+

8.Kd6 Rd2+

9.Kc7 Rc2+

10.Kd8 Re2

11.Rf3 Re4

Black is forced to move his Rook to the 4th rank. Computer analysis predicted all the moves in the main line (Crafty; Olivier Scalbert).

12.Kc7 Rc4+ 13.Kd6 Rd4+ 14.Kc6 Rc4+ 15.Kd5! The Rook is forced away. If now the Black Rook had been on the third rank with the Black pawn at f3 and the White Rook at f2 then ...Rd3+ would have saved the game. That is why White's manoeuvre on move 5 & 6 is so important. 15...Rf1 16.Rxf4 WINS.

A wonderful study with many deep lines; a marvellous triumph. Fully deserves its 1st prize.


Antonio Senatore (ARGENTINA) and Alexander Vojna (UKRAINE ) win the Summer Endgame Tournament

click here>> Solutions and Results


*Henryk Kalafut wins in October*

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION   
Endgame Solving Tournament 2000. This will consist of 3 events: these will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve, 15 in all. Participants have to take part in all three events to be considered for the prize of £100 or equivalent. In case of a tie for 1st place, the prize will be shared. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


ARCHIVES

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