PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 18/02/2001

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Alexander Vojna, Graham White, Allan Bennett, and Henrk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 179

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:5k2/B5p1/8/2P4B/7p/8/1r6/2nK4:


LAST WEEK, POSITION 178

Daniel Yanofsky, (1925-2000).

Canadian International Grandmaster. He first came to the attention of the Chess World at the 1939 Olympiad, when still as a teenager he made the highest percentage score at board two (+12=3-1). His play at this event made a deep impression on Alekhine. In the next forty years he played for his national team many times. He won the Canadian Championship on eight occasions. In 1953 he won the British Championship and came equal first at Hastings.

Yanofsky vs Pinkus

Ventor City, 1941

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:2b5/p6p/2k3p1/3p1p2/PK1P1P1P/6P1/4B3/8:

Here we have a classic "good" versus "bad" Bishop ending. Black's Bishop is bad because its mobility is restricted by his own pawns which are placed on the same colour as the Bishop. Because the Bishop and Pawns both guard the light squares, Black is weak on the dark squares. White's King will invade Black's position on the queenside but first he opens up another front on the Kingside. It will be difficult for Black to guard his weaknesses on both sides of the board.

1.h5!! gxh5

This is favourable for White since it leaves the f-pawn vulnerable to attack and opens the e8-h5 diagonal, but Black has no real choice because White would play h6! with the plan of Bb5-Be8 in order to threaten Bxg6! creating a winning passed pawn.

2.Bxh5 Kb6

Threatening a5+ which would make White's task very difficult.

3.a5+! Kc6

4.Be8+ Kd6

5.Kb5 Ke7

6.Bh5 Kd6

The Black Bishop will be overworked because it has to stop both the King coming to a6 and the attack on the weakened f-pawn.

7.Be2 Bb7

8.Bd3 Bc8

9.Bc2 ...

A waiting move, Black will be soon be forced to give ground.

9... h6

10.Bd3 Bd7+

11.Ka6 Kc7

White now gains the a-pawn and creates a winning passed pawn.

12.Kxa7 Bc8 13.Bc2 h5 14.Bd1 Kc6 15.Ba4+ Kc7 16.Be8 Be6 17.a6 Resigns. Black will lose both his h and d-pawns so will be left with a hopeless ending.

Daniel Yanofsky wrote in his book How to Win End-Games (1957):

'Winning an end-game is an art which must be studied, for the end-game is the poetry of the game of chess.'

 

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A Book Prize will be Awarded to the Highest Placed Newcomer.


Endgame Solving Tournament 2000
 

Alexander Vojna takes the overall prize

Christmas competition >> solutions + results


  COMPETITIONS for 2001

1. Cumulative 2001 Prizes: 1st £100 or equivalent, 2nd £50, 3rd £30; 4th £20. (Total Prize Money=£200) Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 7/1/2001 to 30/12/2001. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

2. Endgame Solving Tournaments 2001. The nature of these events are changing. They will be directed at mainly new or intermediate solvers and will not be too difficult. No money prizes but a book prize for the highest placed newcomer. Events will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


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