PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME 01/07/2001

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you a endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut and Paul Cheng.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 198

White to play & WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p5k1/2p5/3b1KP1/3PpP2/P3P3/1P6/8:
LAST WEEK, POSITION 197

David Bronstein, (1924- )

World Championship Contender. In 1951 David Bronstein drew a match for the World Championship but Botvinnik retained the title in accordance with FIDE rules. Bronstein often had the advantage in middlegame positions but somehow lacked the will to convert these to wins in the final session.

Bronstein vs Romanishin,

Erevan 1975

White to play & WIN (?)

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/1R3pk1/1P4p1/1r5p/7P/6P1/5PK1/8:

This ending is relatively common in practical play and up to now has been called a "win for White". But Black has a remarkable defensive plan which puts this assessment in doubt:

A new discovery in a theoretical Rook and pawn ending

This position has been analysed by Averbakh (Rook Endings. 1987) and Speelman (Batsford Chess Endings. 1993). In order to win White has to break through with his King to the passed b-pawn. But can Black stop White's plan? We follow the actual game continuation:

1.Kf3 Rb2(?)

The Rook attacks the f-pawn but is this the correct idea?

This move was never questioned by two of the worlds greatest endgame theorists. It allows White to carry out his winning plan. The important alternative ...Rb4!! will be considered later.

2.Ke4! Rxf2

3.Rc7! ...

The White Rook makes way for the pawn.

3... Rb2

4.b7 Kf6

Black counterattacks by going for the g-pawn.

5.Kd5! Kf5

5...g5 6.hxg5+ Kg6 7.Kc6 Rb3 8.Rc8 Kxg5 9.b8Q Rxb8 10.Rxb8 Kg4 11.Rg8+ and White wins;

6.Rxf7+ Kg4

7.Rg7! Kxg3

8.Rxg6+ Kxh4

The material situation is now equal but Black is lost

9.Kc6! Kh3

10.Rg5! Rxb7

10...h4 11.Rb5! with a win.

11.Kxb7 h4

12.Kc6 Wins.

In positions similar to the above the Black Rook has always attacked the f-pawn. But this idea has rarely secured the draw. Now let us look at the new idea of 1...Rb4!! The King cannot now get to the b-pawn and valuable time is lost in driving the Rook from b4. The Black King can play an active role by going to the middle of the board (e6), where depending on his opponents moves, can either hinder the progress of the b-pawn, keep the opposing King from advancing or attack the kingside pawns. 2.Ke3 Kf6 3.Kd3 Ke6! 4.Kc3 Rb1 5.f3! (5.Kc4 Rc1+ 6.Kb3 Rb1+ 7.Kc2 Rb5 8.Kc3 Rb1=) 5...Rb5! Black maintains his f-pawn at f7 and keeps his Rook on the b-file. 6.Kd4 Rb1! 7.Rb8 Kd6 The Black King keeps out the opposing monarch. 8.Kc4 Rb2! 9.Kd4 Having made no progress on the queenside the King tries the other side of the board. 9...Rb4+; Blacks Rook is active and should secure the draw.

A recent game with a similar pawn structure: Fedowicz-Yermolinsky 1997 was drawn. Will this new defensive idea stand the test of time? Does the idea apply to a passed a-pawn as well as to the b-pawn? Will players remember it and play it in their own Rook and pawn endings?

The next round of the intermediate endgame solving tournament will start in late August. 

 * www.chessending.com *


Easter Endgame Competition:

Edyta Grylak (USA) Wins with Gerard O'Reilly (GB) Second.

>> Results and Solutions

  

Graham White wins the Cumulative in JUNE.

Click here for the weekly >> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION   

A Book Prize will be Awarded to the Highest Placed Newcomer.


  COMPETITIONS for 2001

1. Cumulative 2001 Prizes: 1st £100 or equivalent, 2nd £50, 3rd £30; 4th £20. (Total Prize Money=£200) Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 7/1/2001 to 30/12/2001. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

2. Endgame Solving Tournaments 2001. The nature of these events are changing. They will be directed at mainly new or intermediate solvers and will not be too difficult. No money prizes but a book prize for the highest placed newcomer. Events will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


ARCHIVES

24/06/01

Position 196

Mitrofanov

17/06/01

Position 195

Euwe (6)

10/06/01

Position 194

Crosskill

03/06/01

Position 193

Spassky

27/05/01

Position 192

Vancura (2)

20/05/01

Position 191

Gunsberg

13/05/01

Position 190

Duras

06/05/01

Position 189

Smyslov

29/04/01

Position 188

Moravec

23/04/01

Position 187

Flohr

16/04/01

Position 186

A. van Tets

08/04/01

Position 185

Rabinovich

01/04/01

Position 184

Kivi

25/03/01

Positon 183

Kashdan (2)

18/03/01

Position 182

Petrosian

11/03/01

Position 181

Simkhovich (2)

04/03/01

Position 180

Euwe (5)

25/02/01

Position 179

Koranyi

18/02/01

Position 178

Yanofsky

11/02/01

Position 177

Mann

04/02/01

Position 176

Timman

28/01/01

Position 175

S. Sakhorov

21/01/01

Position 174

Portisch

14/01/01

Position 173

Kozlowski

07/01/01

Position 172

Euwe(4)

31/12/00

Position 171

Zakhodiakin

17/12/00

Position 170

 Beliavsky

10/12/00

Position 169

Joseph

03/12/00

Position 168

Chigorin

26/11/00

Position 167

L. Kubbel

19/11/00

Position 166

Flohr

12/11/00

Position 165

V & M Platov

5/11/00

Position 164

Romanovsky

29/10/00

Position 163

Keidanz

22/10/00

Position 162

Nimzowitsch

15/10/00

Position 161

Korolkov

08/10/00

Position 160

Stahlberg

01/10/00

Position 159

Mattison (2)

24/9/00

Position158

Simagin

17/9/00

Position 157

Kasantsev

10/9/00

Position156

Keres

3/9/00

Position 155

Guy

27/8/00

Position 154

Lisitsin

20/8/00

Position 153

Benko

13/8/00

Position 152

Botvinnik (2)

6/8/00

Position 151

Havasi (2)

30/7/00

Position 150

Capablanca (4)

23/7/00

Position 149

Berger

16/7/00

Position 148

Tarjan

9/7/00

Position 147

Reek

2/7/00

Position 146

Barden

25/6/00

Position145

Bron

18/6/00

Position144

Fine (2)

11/6/00

Position 143

Frolovsky

4/6/00

Position142

Euwe (3)

28/5/00

Position 141

Nadareishvili

21/5/00

Position 140

Konstantinopolsky

14/5/00

Position 139

Vancura

7/5/00

Position 138

Capablanca (2)
Pre 7/5/00 Archives

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