PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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03/02/2002

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Gerard O'Reilly , Oliver Scalbert and Henryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 227

White to play and WIN

  FORSYTH NOTATION:2R1N1kr/8/3K4/2p5/8/8/8/8:
LAST WEEK, POSITION 226

Mikhail Botvinnik, (1911-1995).

World Champion 1948-57, 1958-1960, 1961-63. The 1920s saw unparalleled growth in the interest of chess in the Soviet Union. As an indication of its rising stature the 5th Soviet Championship (1927) was held in the Hall of Columns, the place where Lenin lay in state after his death in 1924. However this championship would not be remembered for its exotic venue but for the debut of one of its most outstanding figures. Soviet chess was on the up and would soon reach world dominance with Botvinnik winning the World Championship in 1948.

Grigoriev vs Botvinnik

Soviet Championship, 1927

Black to play and WIN

 

  FORSYTH NOTATION:8/6p1/1n3k1p/p7/b2N1K1P/1BP5/6P1/8: 

Botvinnik at an early age (16) shows his great strength in the endgame against a player who would be remembered for his pawn and Rook endgame studies rather than his practical play. Here the young Botvinnik starts by swapping off the Bishops and going into an ending in which the distant passed pawn is a decisive advantage because it will tie down the enemy Knight.

1... Bxb3

2.Nxb3 a4

3.Nc5 ...

White had a choice here but the conclusion is the same. The outside passed pawn limits the mobility of the White Knight: 3.Na1 Nd5+ 4.Ke4 Nxc3+ 5.Kd4 Nd1 6. Kd3 Kf5 7.Ke2 Nc3+ 8.Kf3 a3 9.g4+ Ke5 10.Ke3 Nd5+ with the idea that if White goes to the kingside Black can head for the Knight on a1; and if White prevents this with Kd3, Black picks up the kingside pawns. 3.Nc1 Nd5+ 4.Ke4 Nxc3+ 5.Kd4 Nd1 6.Kd3 Kf5 7.Kd2 Nf2 8.Ne2 Kg4 9.Kc3 Kxh4 10.Kb4 Kg4 11.Kxa4 Nd3 12.Nd4 h5 13.Kb3 Nf4 14.Kc3 Nxg2 and Black wins. 3.Nd2 Nd5+ 4.Ke4 Nxc3+ 5.Kd4 Nd1 6.Nc4 Kf5 7.Kd3 Kg4 8.Kd2 Nf2 9.Ne3+ Kh5! 10.Kc3 g6 11.Nd5 Kxh4 12.Ne7 Kg5 13.Kb4 Nd3+ 14.Kxa4 Nf4 wins.

3... a3

4.g4 a2

The a-pawn ties down the enemy Knight.

4... Na4 5.Nb3 Nxc3 is very strong.

5.Nb3 Nd5+

6.Ke4 Nxc3+

7.Kd4 Na4

Black can also win with: 7... Nd1 8.Ke4 g5 9.h5 Nf2+ 10.Kf3 Nd3 11.Ke3 Nc5 12.Na1 Ke5 13.Kd2 Kf4;

8.Kc4 g5

9.hxg5+ Kxg5

10.Kb4 Kxg4

11.Ka3 ...

11.Kxa4 h5 12.Ka3 h4 13.Kxa2 h3 and the pawn cannot be stopped

11... Nc5

12.Na1 Ne6

Black seeks to paralyse the White knight.

13.Kxa2 Nd4!

The Knight is stalemated and so the h-pawn is unstoppable.

White Resigned.

Gens Una Sumas.
Antonio Senatore and Henryk Kalafut win the CUMULATIVE in January

>> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION


  COMPETITIONS for 2002

1. Cumulative 2002 Prizes: 1st £100 or equivalent, 2nd £50, 3rd £30; 4th £20. (Total Prize Money=£200) Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 6/1/2002 to 22/12/2002 with a recess in July. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

2. Endgame Solving Tournaments 2002. They will be directed at new or intermediate solvers and will not be too difficult. No money prizes but a book prize for the highest placed newcomer. Events will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


ARCHIVES

27/01/02

Position 225

Alekhine

20/01/02

Position 224

Teichmann

13/01/02

Position 223

Bron

06/01/02

Position 222

V. Petrov

23/12/01

Position 221

Dawson

16/12/01

Position 220

Zepler

09/12/01

Position 219

Euwe (7)

02/12/01

Position 218

Prokop

25/11/01

Position 217

Miles

18/11/01

Position 216

Hubner

11/11/01

Position 215

Selesniev

04/11/01

Position 214

Fischer

28/10/01

Position 213

Yakimchik

21/10/01

Position 212

Alatortsev

14/10/01

Position 211

Birnov

7/10/01

Position 210

Tal

30/9/01

Position 209

H. Meyer

23/09/01

Position 208

Pomar

16/09/01

Position 207

Kasparyan

09/09/01

Pst 206

Clarke

02/09/01

Position 205

Dobrescu

26/08/01

Position 204

Nimzowitsch

19/08/01

Position 203

Somov-Nasimovich

12/08/01

Position 202

Mardle

05/08/01

Position 201

Cheron

29/07/01

Position 200

L. Evans

15/07/01

Position 199

Whitworth

08/07/01

Position 198

Capablanca (5)

01/07/01

Position 197

Bronstein

24/06/01

Position 196

Mitrofanov

17/06/01

Position 195

Euwe (6)

10/06/01

Position 194

Crosskill

03/06/01

Position 193

Spassky

27/05/01

Position 192

Vancura (2)

20/05/01

Position 191

Gunsberg

13/05/01

Position 190

Duras

06/05/01

Position 189

Smyslov

29/04/01

Position 188

Moravec
Pre 7/5/00 Archives

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