PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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04/08/2002

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore and Henryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 248

White to play and WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/7K/7P/1P6/2n4k/4n3/1P6/8:  


LAST WEEK, POSITION 247

Mikhail Botvinnik, (1911-1995).

World Champion 1948-57, 1958-1960, 1961-63. Like all world champions Botvinnik was very strong in the endgame. He had an excellent technique and he was particularly good at adjournment analysis, saving many a lost ending. In his epic struggle with Fischer at the 1962 Olympiad , the only time they met over the board, Botvinnik set a subtle trap which allowed him to escape a difficult ending with a draw. Botvinnik showed later that the ending could be held even against Bobby Fischer's improvement on his own play.

 

Botvinnik vs Fischer

Varna, 1962

(Analysis)

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/p5R1/1p4p1/8/3k3P/5K2/5P2/r7:

This position never actually occurred in the game but gives us the situation if Black had chosen the alternative ...Ke5-d4! instead of the pawn move 51...b6-b5?! (see below). The King move seems to be the best try as it leads to complicated play but again only draws as the following analysis shows. The main feature of the ending is the respective promotion of each sides advanced passed pawn. The position becomes very scary with both Kings coming under threat from the new Queens.

1.Rxg6 b5

2.h5 b4

3.h6 ...

3.Rg4+ Kc3 4.Rh4 Re1 5.h6 Re8 6.h7 Rh8 7.Ke2 b3 8.Kd1 Kb2 9.Kd2 a5 10.f3 a4 11.Rxa4 Rxh7 12.Ra8 Rf7 13.Ke3 Rc7 14.Kd2 Rc2+ 15.Kd3 Rc3+ 16. Ke4 Rc4+ 17.Ke5 Kc3 18.Ra1 b2 19.Rb1 Kc2 20.Rxb2+ Kxb2 21.f4 =;

3... b3

3...Rh1 4.Kg2 Rh5 5.Ra6 b3 6.Rxa7 Rxh6 7.Rb7 Kc4 8.Kf3=;

4.Rg4+ Kc5

4...Kc3 is no good because White would promote to a queen with check.

5.Rg5+ Kc6!

5...Kb4 6.Rg7 b2 7.h7 Rh1 8.Rxa7 =;

6.Rg6+ Kb7!

Black plays to avoid the Rook skewer that White could set up on the b-file. The King has to move along the a-file to "a3" where it can seek refuge from the checks.

7.Rg7+ Ka6

8.Rg6+ Ka5

9.Rg5+ Ka4

10.Rg4+ Ka3

Both sides now queen their advanced pawns.

11.Rh4 b2

12.h7 b1Q

13.h8Q Qb3+!

Black gets in first with the checks but surprisingly White's position just holds.

14.Ke2! ...

14.Kg2? Qd5+ 15.Kg3 (15.f3 Qg5+ 16.Rg4 Qd2+ 17.Kg3 Rg1+ 18.Kh4 Rh1+ -+)15... Rg1+ 16.Kf4 Qf7+ 17.Ke3 Re1+ 18.Kd4 Qxf2+ -+;

14. ... Qd1+

15.Ke3 Rb1!

Black develops the Rook.

16.Qf8+ ...

16.Rh3? Ka2! 17.Qg8+ Qb3+ 18.Qxb3+ Rxb3+ -+;

16.Rc4! Rb3+ 17.Rc3 Qe1+ 18.Kd3 Qf1+ 19.Kd2 Qxf2+ 20.Kd3 Qf3+ 21.Kd2! Qf4+ 22.Kd3 and after the exchange of Rooks the Queen ending with the a-pawn is drawn;

16. ... Ka2

17.Qc5! ...

This was Botvinnik's improvement on earlier analysis which began with 17.Qf7+ Rb3+ 18.Ke4 Qd3+ -+; but he did mention that a certain young pupil of his had found a way to draw a move earlier beginning with 16.Rc4!~;

17... Qb3+

18.Ke2 Qe6+

19.Kf3 Qf6+

20.Rf4 Rb3+

21.Kg4 Qg6+

22.Qg5 DRAW

A very difficult ending but worthy of study. The complete analysis includes the input of three World Champions plus other analysts and is a beautiful example of the art of the endgame.

For completeness I give the moves as played in the game with the Black King on "e5". 51...b5?! 52.h5! (Botvinnik's saving idea. A theoretically drawn position with the "a" and h-pawns is reached.) 52...Ra3+ 53.Kg2 gxh5 54.Rg5+ Kd6 55.Rxb5 h4 56.f4 Kc6 57.Rb8 h3+ 58.Kh2 a5 59.f5 Kc7 60.Rb5 Kd6 61.f6 Ke6 62.Rb6+ Kf7 63.Ra6 Kg6 64.Rc6 a4 65.Ra6 Kf7 66.Rc6 Rd3 67.Ra6 a3 68.Kg1 Draw.

 

Gens Una Sumas. 


Antonio Senatore wins in July
.

>> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION


  COMPETITIONS for 2002

1. Cumulative 2002 Prizes: 1st £100 or equivalent, 2nd £50, 3rd £30; 4th £20. (Total Prize Money=£200) Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 6/1/2002 to 22/12/2002 with a recess in July. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

2. Endgame Solving Tournaments 2002. They will be directed at new or intermediate solvers and will not be too difficult. No money prizes but a book prize for the highest placed newcomer. Events will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


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