PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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03/11/2002

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Jim Monaghan, Olivier Scalbert, Antonio Senatore and Henryk Kalafut.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 261

White to play and DRAW

FORSYTH NOTATION:K1B5/2P1R3/8/1r6/1n6/6r1/8/2k5:
LAST WEEK, POSITION 260

Andre Cheron, (1895-1980).

French player, analyst and endgame composer. Chess champion of France in 1926, 1927 and 1929. Author of a very famous work on the endgame, the four-volume: Lehr- und Handbuch der Schachendspiele (1952-71). Due to his poor health Cheron lived the latter part of his life in the mountains of Switzerland.

 Cheron, 1970

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/b7/P7/3Bk3/2K1P3/8/8/8 w:

In Bishops of opposite colour endings, a two pawn advantage may sometimes be insufficient to win. The defending side blockades the position and the pawns are unable to advance.

But in the above situation White has two favourable factors which enable him to bring home the victory. Firstly, White has room on the kingside to manoeuvre his King so that one of the pawns can advance safely. If the position was moved one square to the right, the result would be a draw because the King would not have enough room to get by on the kingside. Secondly, White has the "right" Bishop for his a-pawn, i.e. Black does not have at his disposal the drawing resource of sacrificing his Bishop for the e-pawn and running the Monarch to the a8 corner where it can never be driven out because the enemy Bishop is of the "wrong" colour.

1.Kd3! ...

The King starts his long journey to the queenside. If he plays 1...Kb5 then the way is blocked by the reply 1...Kd6;

1...Kf4

2.Ke2 Bd4

3.Kf1! Ba7

4.Kg2 Bd4

4...Kg4? 5.e5! Kf5 6.e6 Kf6 7.Kg3 (The winning plan is easy. The Bishop will guard the e-pawn and the King will go to the queenside to shepherd home the a-pawn) 7...Ke7 8.Kf4 Kd6 9.Kf5 Ke7 10.Bc4 Bb8 11.Bb3 Ba7 12.Ke5 Bg1 13.Kd5 Ba7 14.Kc6 Bg1 15.Kb7 wins;

5.Kh3 Bf2

6.Bb7 Kg5

6...Ba7 7.Kh4 Bd4 8.Kh5 Ke5 9.Kg6! Ke6 10.Bd5+ Ke5 11.Kf7 Kd6 12.Bb7! Bb6 13.Kf6! Bd4+ 14.Kf5 Bb6 15.e5+ Ke7 16.e6 Bg1 17.Ke5 Bh2+ 18.Kd5 Bb8 19.Bc8 Kd8 20.Kc6 Ba7 21.Kb7 Bc5 22.Bd7 Bg1 23.a7 Bxa7 24.Kxa7 wins;

7.Bc6 Kf4

7...Ba7 8.Bd5 Kf4 9.Kh4 Ke5 10.Kg5 Bb6 11.Kg6 Bd4 12.Kf7 Kd6 13.Bb7 Kc7 14.Ke6 and the e-pawn will be able to advance;

8.Bd5 Be3

9.Kh4 Ke5

10.Kh5 Kf6

11.Bb7 Ba7

12.Kh6 Bb6

13.Kh7 Bd4

13...Kf7 14.Bd5+ Kf6 15.Kg8 Bc5 16.Bb7 Kg6 17.Bc8 Kf6 18.Bf5 Ke7 19.e5 Bd4 20.Kh7 Kf7 21.Kh6 Be3+ 22.Kh5 Ke7 23.Kg4 Kd8 24.Kf3 Ba7 25.Ke4 Kc7 26.Kd5 and White wins.

14.Kg8 Bc5

15.Bd5 Ke5

15...Ke7 16.e5! with a win;

16.Kf7 Kd6

17.Ke8 Bb6

18.Bb7 Ke6

19.Ba8 Kd6

20.Bd5 Bd4

21.Kd8 wins.

White will be able to shepherd home the a-pawn.

Gens Una Sumas. 
Olivier Scalbert wins in October.

>> CUMULATIVE COMPETITION


  COMPETITIONS for 2002

1. Cumulative 2002 Prizes: 1st £100 or equivalent, 2nd £50, 3rd £30; 4th £20. (Total Prize Money=£200) Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 6/1/2002 to 22/12/2002 with a recess in July. Present CUMULATIVE COMPETITION rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.

2. Endgame Solving Tournaments 2002. They will be directed at new or intermediate solvers and will not be too difficult. No money prizes but a book prize for the highest placed newcomer. Events will take place at Easter, Summer and Christmas each consisting of 5 positions to solve. Present strict rules will apply; no computer analysis.


ARCHIVES

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Position 259

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Position 245

Tal

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Position 244

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Position 243

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Position 242

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Position 241

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Position 240

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Position 239

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Position 238

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Position 237

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Position 236

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Position 235

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Position 234

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Position 232

Berger

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Position 231

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Position 230

Mattison

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Position 229

Czerniak

17/02/02

Position 228

Kopayev
Pre 7/5/00 Archives

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