PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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06/04/2003

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Jon Palmer, Henryk Kalafut, Olivier Scalbert, Gerard O' Reilly, Alexander Voyna, Miguel Martinez and Jim Monaghan .
THIS WEEK

POSITION 282

White to Play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:8/3p3p/3B3k/P1Pp1p1P/8/8/5P2/1b5K w - - 0 1:

> > Cumulative competition


LAST WEEK, POSITION 281

Yefim Geller, (1925-1998).

Soviet Grandmaster, World Championship Candidate. He won the Soviet Championship twice: in 1955 he tied with Smyslov, then defeated him in the play-off. Again he won it in 1979 at the age of 54. The closest he came to the World Championship was in 1962 when he was equal second with Keres in the Candidates tournament, half a point behind Petrosian. 

Furman vs Geller,

USSR Ch, 1975

Black to Play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:5k2/pp3pp1/4rn1p/3p3P/3P4/6N1/PP2BK2/3N4 b - - 0 1:

The ending of two minor pieces against a Rook can be difficult to assess even when the latter has pawn superiority which in this case is two pawns more. It often comes down to the relative mobility of the pieces. Black has a well placed Rook against White's uncoordinated pieces which can attack White's weak pawns. The accumulation of these advantages gives Black a winning ending. The following are the actual moves played in the game:

1... Ne4+!

White is forced to exchange, otherwise he loses material.

2.Nxe4 Rxe4

3.Nc3 ...

3.Bf3 Rxd4 4.Ke3 Rh4 5.Bxd5 Rxh5 6.Bxb7 g5 and the three kingside pawns must win;

3... Rxd4

4.Ke3? ...

White misses the best defence. It was much better to play 4.b3! safeguarding his queenside pawns, 4...g5! 5.hxg6 fxg6 6.Ke3 Rh4 7.Nxd5. -+ Black has winning chances with his two passed pawns.

4... Rb4!

5.Nxd5 Rxb2

Black is clearly winning

6.Bc4 ...

Black can now quickly mobilize the queenside pawns.

6... b5!

7.Bb3 a5

8.Nf4 ...

8... a4

9.Bd5 b4

And now White brings the Knight to the queenside to help with the defence.

10.Nd3 Rh2

White will have difficulty defending both his remaining pawns.

11.Nxb4 ...

11.Bf3? Rxa2 12.Nxb4 Rb2 13.Nd3 a3! 14.Nxb2 a2 and the pawn promotes.

11...Rxh5

WHITE RESIGNS.

He decides to throw in the towel as the three connected passed pawns are too hot to handle.

Gens Una Sumas. 
Jon Palmer wins in March.

> > Cumulative competition


  COMPETITIONS for 2003

1. Cumulative 2003 Prizes: 1st £100 or equivalent, 2nd £50, 3rd £30; 4th £20. (Total Prize Money=£200) Entries limited to 20 solvers. This event will run from 5/1/2003 to 22/12/2003 with a recess in July. Present rules apply but note the prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.


ARCHIVES

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Position 280

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23/03/05

Position 279

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16/03/05

Position 278

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09/03/05

Position 277

A.R.B. Thomas

02/03/03

Position 276

Zoltan

23/02/03

Position 275

Shirov

16/02/03

Position 274

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09/02/03

Position 273

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02/02/03

Position 272

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26/01/03

Position 271

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19/01/03

Position 270

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12/01/03

Position 269

Pachman

05/01/03

Position 268

Troitzky
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