PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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22/02/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut, Jon Palmer, Gerald O'Reilly, Valdir Uchoa Jr, Yuriy Steschenko and Rainer Staudte.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 322

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:4k3/R4p2/8/p2PK1p1/6P1/r4P2/8/8 w - - 0 1:

> > Cumulative competition


LAST WEEK, POSITION 321

Hermann Mattison, (1894-1932).

Latvian chessplayer and study composer. He won the first Latvian championship in 1924 and the first FIDE world amateur championship in Paris in the same year. He played first board for the Latvian team at the Prague Olympiad in 1931 and scored wins against Alekhine, Vidmar and Rubinstein. He composed over 60 studies, many of which are of great artistic value.

 

 Mattison, 1929

Black to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:8/8/2K2P2/2p4k/PpPp4/8/P7/8 b - - 0 1:

This study which Mattison dedicated to Vera Menchik, the 1st Lady World Champion, was found to be flawed not long after it had been published. In the starting position the f-pawn was at "f5" and not at "f6" as shown above and the composer's stipulation was: White to play and draw. The main line below shows clearly that this is not so and that the composer overlooked an important resource which enables Black to win. Fortunately although the position is unsound in its original form, we can still use it as a solving exercise as shown here:

1... Kg6

2.Kd5! ...

A subtle move which allows White to get in reach of the square of Black's d-pawn (d1-d4-g4-g1) and at the same time threaten to queen the f-pawn. If 2.Kxc5?? Black wins easily with 2...d3.

2... Kxf6

2...d3? 3.Ke6! d2 4.f7 d1Q 5.f8Q =;

3.Ke4 ...

3.a5?? and Black's d-pawn queens first with check.

3... Ke6

Black is within the square of the passed a-pawn, and threatens to capture it.

4.Kd3 ...

4.a5? Kd6 5.a6 Kc7 6.Kd3 Kb8 7.Ke4 Ka7 8.Kd3 Kxa6-+ ;

4... Kd6

5.Kc2 Kc6

6.Kb2! ...

6.Kb3? d3 7.a5 Kb7 8.Kb2 Ka6 -+;

6... Kb6!

6...d3? 7.Kc1 Kb6 8.Kd2 Ka5 9.Kxd3 Kxa4 10.Kc2 Ka3 11.Kb1 =;

7.a3 d3!

This is the beginning of the winning variation that was discovered after the original study had been published. Mattison's analysis went: 7...Ka5? 8.Kb3! d3 9.axb4+ cxb4 10.c5! Ka6 (10...d2 11.Kc2 Kxa4 12.Kxd2 =) 11.Kb2 Kb7 12.a5! Kc6 13.a6 Kc7 14.Kb3! Kc6 15.Kb2 with perpetual draw. I expect that the composer looked at the 7...d3! variation but under-estimated the impact of the advancing b-pawn in the latter stage.

7...bxa3? 8. Kxa3 Ka5 9. Kb3 d3 10. Kc3 Kxa4 11. Kxd3 Kb4 12.Kd2! (12.Kc2?? Kxc4 Wins) 12.Kxc4 13Kc2=;

8.axb4 cxb4

9.Kb3 ...

9.Kc1? b3! 10.Kb2 d2 wins.

9... Kc5

We now have a pawn race which is in Black's favour because his pawns are more advanced.

10.a5 Kd4!

11.a6 d2

12.Kc2 Ke3

13.a7 b3+!

A nice tempo gaining move which brings home the win. The b-pawn advances to the queening square . It cannot be taken because Black's d-pawn will queen with check and then be able to stop the a-pawn from queening. In order to win Black needs to promote both his pawns.

13...Ke2? 14.a8Q d1Q+ 15.Kb2 Qd4+ 16.Kb1 Qxc4 17.Qg2+ Kd3 18.Qg3+ Kd2 19.Qf2+ Kd3 20.Qf3+ Kd4 21.Qf4+ Kc3 22.Qxc4+ Kxc4 23.Kc2=;

14.Kc3 ...

14.Kb2? d1Q 15.a8Q Qc2+ wins;

14... d1Q

15.a8Q Qc2+!

16.Kb4 b2!

Black wins. White will soon run out of checks and Black will have an extra Queen. A beautiful ending which was unfortunately overlooked by an outstanding composer.

 

 Gens Una Sumus


Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut and Gerald O'Reilly win in January

> > Cumulative competition

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st =

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna - Ukraine

4th

Gerald O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
Pre 16/11/03 Archives

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15/02/04

Position 320

Reshevsky

08/02/04

Position 319

K. A. L. Kubbel

01/02/04

Position 318

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25/01/04

Position 317

Troitzky

18/01/04

Position 316

Szabo

11/01/04

Position 315

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04/01/04

Position 314

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21/12/03

Position 313

Botvinnik

14/12/03

Position 312

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07/12/03

Position 311

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30/11/03

Position 310

Koranyi

23/11/03

Position 309

Rosselli del Turco

16/11/03

Position 308

Blandford