PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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29/02/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut, Jon Palmer, Gerald O'Reilly, Valdir Uchoa Jr, Yuriy Steschenko and Rainer Staudte.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 323

White to play and WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION

:8/8/2Q5/2K5/4N3/6p1/k5q1/8 w - - 0 1:  

> > Cumulative competition


LAST WEEK, POSITION 322

Fridrik Olafsson, (1935- )

International Grandmaster. World Championship Candidate. Many times champion of Iceland. 1st equal with Korchnoi at Hastings 1955/56. In the Portoroz interzonal tournament of 1958 he came 5th= with Bobby Fischer, thus qualifying for the Candidates Tournament of 1959. Former FIDE President. In 1982 appointed secretary to the Icelandic Parliament.

Olafsson vs Tal

Portoroz, 1958

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:4k3/R4p2/8/p2PK1p1/6P1/r4P2/8/8 w - - 0 1:

This ending played in the final round of the tournament was very tense. Tal had secured his place in the 1959 candidates by beating Panno brilliantly in the previous round. He only wanted a draw to come 1st in the tournament but Olafsson found himself in a good position in this Rook and pawn ending so he wasn't interested in sharing the point. During the adjournament Tal and his second Koblents worked out a plan to create a situation in which Olafsson might make a mistake and thus increase Tal's chances of saving the ending. Their plan worked and so Tal came 1st, but Olafsson was not too disappointed with the result as he only needed a draw to secure his place in the Candidates. We start with the moves played in this difficult ending but from move.5.d7!! we follow the proposed winning line.

1.Kd6! ...

White threatens mate and the King is ready to support the passed pawn to it's queening square.

1... Kf8

This looks crazy taking away the King from the passed pawn but Tal complicates knowing that the ending is technically lost for him.

1...f6 2.Ke6 Re3+ 3.Kxf6 Rxf3+ 4.Kxg5 Ra3 5.Kf6 a4 6.g5 Rf3+ 7.Kg7 a3 8.g6 Rh3 9.Kg8 Rg3 10.g7 Rh3 11.d6!+-;

2.Kd7 a4!

2...Rxf3? 3.d6 f5 4.Ke6 fxg4 5.Ra8+ Kg7 6.d7 Rd3 7.d8Q +-;

3.d6 Kg7

4.Ke8! ...

Threatening Rxf7+ , 4.Kc8? Rc3+ 5.Kd8 a3 =;

4... Rxf3

5.d7!! ...

This leads to a clear win. In the game he played 5.Rxa4?! White is still winning but it is more difficult. Play continued: 5...Re3+ 6.Kd8 f5 and Olafsson went wrong with 7.gxf5? (Instead 7Ra5! was White's last shot to win: 7...Kf6 8.Rxf5+ Ke6 9.Ke8! Kxd6+ 10.Kf7! Re4 11.Rxg5 Rf4+ 12.Kg7 Ke7 13.Rg6 Rf7+ 14.Kh6 Kf8 15.Ra6 or 15.g5 win according to EGTB's ) The game continued: 7... Kf6 8.Ra6 (8.d7 Kxf5 9.Rd4 Ra3! 10.Kc7 Ra8! 11.Ra4 Rg8=) 8...Kxf5 9.Kc7 g4 10.d7 Re7 11.Kd6 Rxd7+ 12.Kxd7 g3 13.Kd6 g2 14.Ra1 Ke4 game drawn;

5... Re3+

Forcing the enemy King to block his own pawn.

5...Rd3? 6.d8Q Rxd8+ 7.Kxd8 Kf6 8.Rxa4+-;

6.Kd8 a3

6...Rc3 7.Rxa4 Kf8 8.Ra8 f6 9.Rc8 Rd3 10.Kc7+ Ke7 11.Re8+ Kf7 12.d8Q+-;

6...Rd3 7.Kc8 Rc3+ 8.Rc7 Rd3 9.d8Q+-;

7.Ra8! ...

Covers the queening square and thus secures the promotion of the d-pawn.

7.Kc8 Rc3+ 8.Rc7 Rxc7+ 9.Kxc7 a2=;

7... f5!

Black counter-attacks by creating a passed g-pawn on the kingside which will be supported by the King. From what follows we see that this plan only just fails.

7... Kf6 8.Kc7 Rc3+ 9.Kb6 Rd3 10.d8Q+ Rxd8 11.Rxd8 Ke5 12.Ra8 Kf4 13.Rxa3 Kxg4 14.Kc5 f5 15.Kd5 Kf4 16.Ra4+ Kg3 17.Ke5 f4 18.Ke4 g4 19.Ra2 f3 20.Ke3 Kh4 21.Kf4 Kh5 22.Rd2 Kg6 23.Kxg4+-;

8.Kc7 Rc3+

9.Kb6 Rd3

10.d8Q Rxd8

11.Rxd8 fxg4

11...f4 12.Kc5 f3 13.Rd2 Kf6 14.Kd4+-;

12.Kc5! ...

The White King goes to blockade the advanced g-pawn.

12... g3

12...Kf6 13.Kd4 g3 14.Ke3 a2 15.Ra8 Kf5 16.Rxa2+-;

13.Rd2! ...

The advanced passed pawns must be held on the 3rd rank.

13... Kf6

The King travels forward to support the advanced g-pawn.

14.Kd4 Kf5

15.Ke3 Kg4

16.Ke2 g2

17.Kf2 Kh3

18.Kg1 WINS

It is a close finish. The White King gets back just in time. A very instructive ending.

 Gens Una Sumus


Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut and Gerald O'Reilly win in January

> > Cumulative competition

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st=

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna

4th

Gerald O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
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