PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

14/03/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut, Gerard O'Reilly, Valdir Uchoa Jr, Jon Palmer and Yuriy Steschenko.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 325

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION :8/8/8/KP3Pk1/8/8/7n/8 w - - 0 1:

Not too difficult this week. It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

> > Cumulative competition


LAST WEEK, POSITION 324

Paul Keres, (1916-1975).

Estonian and Soviet Grandmaster. World Championship Candidate. In 1939 Keres was in fine form at the traditional Easter tournament at Margate. He won 1st prize, one point ahead of Capablanca and Flohr. Later that year he played an important match with Euwe, the former Dutch World Champion. Although it was billed as a friendly match, the general opinion was that the winner would have the moral right to challenge Alekhine for the World Championship. Keres won the match by the margin of one point but his chances of a title match disappeared with the outbreak of War. Paul Keres was one of the greatest players in chess history, but sadly he was never destined to play a match for the World Championship.

 Golombek vs Keres

Margate, 1939

Black to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:8/7p/2pk2p1/pp4P1/3bP2P/1P1N1K2/P7/8 b - - 0 1:

In 1964, Harry Golombek told a B.B.C. radio audience about an ending he resigned against Paul Keres at Margate, 1938 (sic) just when he had obtained a drawn position. Golombek vs Keres, Margate, 1939 is the ending in question and this was indeed the case as the analysis will show.

The main line is the actual moves played in the game until the fateful move 9...Bb2? Keres thought this move won outright and so did his opponent; Golombek resigned the game. Later Reuben Fine explained in his Basic Chess Endings (McKay, 1941 ) why Golombek had resigned but Hooper & Euwe in their Guide to Chess Endings( 1958) pointed out a flaw in Fine's analysis. This flaw has been carried over to the new algebraic edition of Basic Chess Endings. (Fine, Benko 2003). Hooper & Euwe analysis showed that with best play the ending should have been drawn after 9...Bb2? The main line below follows the winning move 9...Bc3! which seems to have been missed by all the main analysts of this intriguing story.

Black has a number of positional advantages i.e. queenside majority, more active minor piece with play against the enemy kingside pawns. The passed White e-pawn is no threat.

1... c5!

Black uses his queenside majority to create a passed pawn.

2.Nf4 ...

2.Ne1 c4 3.bxc4 bxc4 4.Nc2 Kc5 5.Ke2 Be5 6.Kf3 c3 7.Kf2 Kc4 8.Ke2 Bg3 9.Na3+ Kc5 10.Kd3 Bxh4 11.Kxc3 Bxg5 -+ creating powerful passed pawns on the kingside.

2... c4

3.bxc4 bxc4

4.Nd5 Ke5

5.Nf6 ...

White counter-attacks on the kingside but Black has a ready answer.

5... h5!

6.Nd5 c3

7.Nf4 c2

8.Nd3+ Kd6

9.Ke2 Bc3!!

The winning idea is that the Bishop can attack the kingside pawns via "e1". White will not be able to cope with play on two fronts.

The Bishop is an excellent piece when play is spread across the board.

The game continuation was 9...Bb2?? and White resigned ??

Hooper & Euwe showed that White could indeed draw from this position: 10.Kd2 c1Q+ 11.Nxc1 Bxc1+ 12.Kxc1 Ke5 13.Kc2 Kxe4 14.Kc3! the correct plan. White draws by creating a passed g-pawn. (Fine in "Basic Chess Endings" and Keres and Golombek only considered: 14.Kb3?? the wrong plan. Black wins the race to gain a new Queen... Kf4 15.Ka4 Kg4 16.Kxa5 Kxh4 17.a4 Kxg5 18.Kb6 h4 19.a5 h3 20.a6 h2 21.a7 h1Q with a win.) 14...Kf4 15.Kd4! Kg4 16.Ke5! Kxh4 17.Kf6 Kg3 18.Kxg6 h4 19.Kf5 h3 20.g6 h2 21.g7 h1Q 22.g8Q+ with a draw.

10.a4 ...

10.Ke3 Be1! 11.e5+ Ke6 12.Kd4 Bxh4 13.Kc3 Bg3! 14.Kxc2 h4 -+;

10.Nc1 Ke5 11.Ke3 Be1! 12.Kd3 Bxh4 13.Kxc2 Bxg5 -+;

10... Bb4!

11.Nc1 Ke5

12.Ke3 Be1!

White will have difficulty in coping with both the passed c-pawn and his weaknesses on the kingside.

13.Nd3+ ...

13.Kd3 Bxh4 14.Kxc2 Bxg5 with a win.

13... Kd6

14.Ke2 Bxh4

Creating a powerful passed h-pawn.

15.Kd2 Bg3!  

White has no reasonable defence against the advance of the h-pawn.

 Gens Una Sumus


Rainer Staudte wins in February

> > Cumulative competition

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna

4th

Gerard O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
Pre 16/11/03 Archives

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07/03/04

Position 323

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29/02/04

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22/02/04

Position 321

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15/02/04

Position 320

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08/02/04

Position 319

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01/02/04

Position 318

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25/01/04

Position 317

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18/01/04

Position 316

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11/01/04

Position 315

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04/01/04

Position 314

Horwitz & Kling

21/12/03

Position 313

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14/12/03

Position 312

Lazard

07/12/03

Position 311

V. Petrov

30/11/03

Position 310

Koranyi

23/11/03

Position 309

Rosselli del Turco

16/11/03

Position 308

Blandford