PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

25/04/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to David Ewing, Steven B. Dowd, Antonio Senatore, Rainer Staudte, Henryk Kalafut, Gerard O'Reilly and Valdir Uchoa Jr.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 330

White to play and WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION

:r3r1k1/1p3p1p/2p1bBpR/4P3/p3P3/3R4/5KPP/5B2 w - - 0 39:  

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

> > Cumulative competition


LAST WEEK, POSITION 329

Alexei Troitzky, (1866-1942)

Russian/Soviet Endgame Composer. He is regarded as one of the founders of the art of modern endgame study composition. His name will always be synonymous with the solving of the difficult ending of two Knights vs pawn. In his theoretical treatise of this class of ending he built on the early work of Guretzky-Cornitz and particularly of the analysis of Chapais (1780). Troitzky has composed over a thousand studies. He wrote: A Selection of Chess Studies (1937).

A. A. Troitzky, 1898

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/3p1K2/4ppP1/6kb/7p/4N3/5N2/8 w - - 0 1:

In this composition Troitzky builds on the work of some of the great analysts of the past. He gives a new introduction to a classical ending, the solution of which had been known since the 18th century and probably even earlier. Troitzky's study predates the publication of his theoretical treatise on the NNvP ending so it may have acted as a kind of catalyst which started him on the long road of enlightenment for this particular class of chess ending and which brought him worldwide fame.

Black is threatening to win the g-pawn. White cannot make any progress until the pawn is free to advance.

1.Nh3+ Kh6

2.Ng4+! ...

He releases the Bishop pin by sacrificing one of the Knights.

2... Bxg4

3.g7 ...

Now the g-pawn is free to promote.

3... e5!

Allowing room for the important Bishop check at e6.

3...Bh5+? 4.Kf8! with a win or 3...f5? 4.g8Q Bh5+ 5.Kf6 Bg6 6.Qxg6#

4.g8N+! ...

4.g8Q?? Be6+ and Black wins easily.

4... Kh5

4...Kh7 5.Nxf6+ Kh6 transposes to the main line. If 5...Kh8 Black is quickly mated: 6.Nxg4 eg 6...d6 7.Nf6 d5 8.Ng5 h3 9.Kg6 h210.Nf7#.

5.Nxf6+ Kh6

6.Nxg4+ Kh5

6...Kh7? 7.Ng5+ Kh8 8.Nxe5 h3 9.Ng6#

7.Nf6+! ...

7.Nxe5? d6 8.Ng6 Kg4 9.Ngf4 d5 10.Kf6 d4 11.Ke5 d3 12.Nf2+ Kg3 13.N4xd3 h3 14.Nh1+ Kg2 15.Ndf2Kf3 with a draw.

7... Kh6

8.Nxd7 e4

9.Nf6! e3

10.Ng4+ Kh5

10...Kh7 11.Ng5+ Kh8 12.Ne5 and mates next move.

11.Nxe3 ...

This position and the analysis that follows is not new. It is found in the classical work of Chapais (1780) and Guretzky-Cornitz (1863) and other earlier composers. The important feature of this ending is the blockading Knight at h3 and how it assists in the mating operation on the enemy King. The Black h-pawn is allowed to advance and in this case to queen because it lifts the stalemate threat. If the two Knights were alone on the board the mate could never be forced because of the danger of stalemate

11... Kh6

12.Kf6 Kh5

12...Kh7 13.Nf5 Kg8 (13...Kh8 14.Kf7 Kh7 15.Ng5+ Kh8 16.Ne7 h3 17.Ng6#) 14.Ke7 Kh7 15.Kf7 Kh8 16.Ng5 h3 17.Ne7 h2 18.Ng6#

13.Nf4+ Kh6

14.Ng4+ Kh7

15.Kf7 h3

16.Nd5 ...

16.Nh5, 16.Ne6 or 16.Ng6 all lead to mate in the same number of moves.

16... h2

17.Ndf6+ Kh8

18.Ne5 ...

Without the advance of the h-pawn Black would be stalemated.

18... h1Q

19.Ng6 MATE.

Troitzky went on to discover the general rule for this class of ending indicating the winning and drawing zones for different positions of the blockading Knight and pawn. His treatise is found in Chess Studies (1937). It remains the most thorough examination of an ending, unaided by computer analysis, ever carried out by a human analyst. For a recent computer update see Karsten Muller's  excellent articles on the KNNvpK ending in his Endgame Corner at www.chesscafe.com.

 

 Gens Una Sumus


> > Cumulative competition

Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut and Gerard O'Reilly win in MARCH.

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna

4th

Gerard O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
Pre 16/11/03 Archives

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18/04/04

Position 328

Em Lasker

02/04/04

Position 327

Kralin

28/03/04

Position 326

Larsen

21/03/04

Position 325

Benko

14/03/04

Position 324

Keres

07/03/04

Position 323

Reti

29/02/04

Position 322

Olafsson

22/02/04

Position 321

Mattison

15/02/04

Position 320

Reshevsky

08/02/04

Position 319

K. A. L. Kubbel

01/02/04

Position 318

Gligoric

25/01/04

Position 317

Troitzky

18/01/04

Position 316

Szabo

11/01/04

Position 315

 V. & M. Platov

04/01/04

Position 314

Horwitz & Kling

21/12/03

Position 313

Botvinnik

14/12/03

Position 312

Lazard

07/12/03

Position 311

V. Petrov

30/11/03

Position 310

Koranyi

23/11/03

Position 309

Rosselli del Turco

16/11/03

Position 308

Blandford