PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

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06/06/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Steven B. Dowd, Antonio Senatore, Rainer Staudte, Henryk Kalafut, Gerard O'Reilly and Valdir Uchoa Jr.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 336

White to play and WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION

:3b4/3k1pn1/1p3p2/p2K3p/2P2P1P/2N3P1/P1B5/8 w - - 0 1: 

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

> > Cumulative competition

Important Message: The last position before the Summer recess will go up on July 4th (deadline for solutions 09/07/04). The competition will start up again on August 22nd. In the week previous to this date competitors will be sent an email warning them of the new start. Thanks to you all for your continuing support.


LAST WEEK, POSITION 335

C.E.C. Tattersall, (1877-1957).

English Endgame Composer, Player and Chess Author. Remembered mainly as the compiler of the first major collection of endgame studies: A Thousand End-Games, published by BCM (1910-11). This was ground-breaking work by Tattersall in which he collected together the studies of Horwitz and Kling, Rinck and Troitzky and other earlier composers and classified them according to the material present. This was a brilliant work of love by Tattersall which has received very little acknowledgement.

C.E.C. Tattersall

BCM, 1909

White to play and WIN

(Position taken from study +0130.11b7c5)

FORSYTH NOTATION

:8/8/p3k3/P1K5/8/8/3R4/5b2 w - - 0 1:

The inspiration for this didactic study probably came from the game ending Salwe vs Rubinstein, Prague, 1908 which took place a few months before the above study was published. In this ending the rook pawns were blocked on the fourth and fifth ranks. For nearly fifty years theoreticians puzzled over this ending. The full story can be found in books by such endgame authorities as Benko, Dvoretsky and Averbakh.

In the above study Tattersall indicates the winning technique for pawns blocked on the 5/6 ranks which seems to predate by forty years another study by Jens Enevoldsen. I indicate a position from the Enevoldsen study to show the similarity:

POSITION 335A

Enevoldsen, 1949

White to play and WIN

(Position taken from study +0130.22d6b8)

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/2K5/p3k3/P7/3R4/8/8/5b2 w - - 0 1:

Solution for Position 335:

Both of these studies can be found in Van der Heidjen's endgame study database. So for the first time Tattersall shows the winning technique for the stronger side with the a-pawns blocked on the 5/6 ranks. The process of winning for pawns in this situation is relatively easy to understand. The Black King is driven far away, to the f-file before the Rook is given up for the Bishop and pawn on "a6". The reason for this is to avoid the well known draw with K v KRP. Also in some variations he can win by exchanging the Rook for Bishop on "b5".  

1.Rd6+ Ke7

1...Ke5 2.Rd1 Bb5 3.Re1+ Kf6 4.Kb6 Kf7 5.Kb7! Bc4 and now the Rook can get to the 6th rank by attacking the Bishop as shown in the main line. If Black had played 5...Kf6 then 6.Rb1! threatens to win with 7.Rxb5. If the bishop moves then again the Rook reaches the 6th rank and White wins with 8.Rxa6.

2.Kc6 Bb5+

With other Bishop moves along the a6-f1 diagonal the winning process is basically the same.

3.Kc7 ...

White wants to drive the King to the f-file so the Kings need to be facing each other.

 3... Bc4

The Rook now gains an important tempo by hitting the Rook.

4.Rd4 Bb5

5.Re4+ Kf7

White is now ready to attack the a-pawn.

6.Kb7 Bd3  

7...Kf6 8.Rb4 Bd3 9.Rb6+ Ke5 10.Rxa6 Bxa6+ 11.Kxa6+-

 7.Rd4 Be2

 7...Bb5 8.Rd6 +-; 

9.Rd6 Ke7

10.Rxa6 Bxa6+

11.Kxa6 WINS.

Gens Una Sumus
> > Cumulative competition 

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna

4th

Gerard O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
Pre 16/11/03 Archives

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30/05/04

Position 334

Tartakower

23/05/04

Position 333

Sochniev

16/05/04

Position 332

Polugayevsky

09/05/04

Position 331

Koltanowski

02/05/04

Position 330

Euwe

25/04/04

Position 329

Troizky

18/04/04

Position 328

Em Lasker

02/04/04

Position 327

Kralin

28/03/04

Position 326

Larsen

21/03/04

Position 325

Benko

14/03/04

Position 324

Keres

07/03/04

Position 323

Reti

29/02/04

Position 322

Olafsson

22/02/04

Position 321

Mattison

15/02/04

Position 320

Reshevsky

08/02/04

Position 319

K. A. L. Kubbel

01/02/04

Position 318

Gligoric

25/01/04

Position 317

Troitzky

18/01/04

Position 316

Szabo

11/01/04

Position 315

 V. & M. Platov

04/01/04

Position 314

Horwitz & Kling

21/12/03

Position 313

Botvinnik

14/12/03

Position 312

Lazard

07/12/03

Position 311

V. Petrov

30/11/03

Position 310

Koranyi

23/11/03

Position 309

Rosselli del Turco

16/11/03

Position 308

Blandford