PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

27/06/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Rainer Staudte, Henryk Kalafut, Gerard O'Reilly and Valdir Uchoa Jr.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 339

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:6k1/3p4/P2P4/8/5Kp1/1p4Q1/p5p1/b7 w - - 0 1:

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

> > Cumulative competition

Important Message: The last position before the Summer recess will go up on July 4th (deadline for solutions 09/07/04). The competition will start up again on August 22nd. In the week previous to this date competitors will be sent an email warning them of the new start. Thanks to you all for your continuing support.
LAST WEEK, POSITION 338

Tigran Petrosian, (1929 -1984). 

World Champion 1963-69. Soviet Grandmaster. In the early 1950's, Petrosian emerged from the ranks of Soviet Masters to become a leading player and a Candidate for the world championship. It was on the the island of Curacao, in the Caribbean, playing in his 4th Candidate tournament where he had his greatest triumph, taking first place (+8 =9) and so becoming Botvinnik's challenger and then defeating him in a match for the World Championship. This year is celebrated as the 75th Anniversary of the birth of this great player.

Petrosian v Fischer,

Portoroz, 1958  

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION

:4r3/2p5/7R/3k4/2p2PP1/5K2/8/8 w - - 0 1:

This ending is taken from the 1st game that these two great players contested at classical chess. Petrosian was already a veteran who had played in two previous Candidate tournaments whereas Fischer was a brilliant young teenager. In the coming years they would face each other many times and would produce tense and exciting games which had an influence on the history of chess. The result of this ending was a draw but Petrosian showed later in a bulletin of the tournament that he could have won. From a theoretical point of view two connected pawns are stronger than double pawns and Petrosian proves that this is the case for this Rook and pawn ending.

1.Rh7! ...

The game continuation was: 1.Rh1? c3 2.g5 c5 3.Rd1+ (3.g6 Rg8 4.f5 Ke5 5.Kg4 Kf6 6.Rc1 Rd8 7.Rxc3 Rd4+ 8.Kh5 c4 9.Rg3 Rd3! = ) 3...Kc4 4.g6 c2 5.Rc1 Kd3 6.f5 Rg8! 7.Kf4 Kd2 8.Rxc2+ Kxc2 9.Kg5 c4 10.f6 c3 11.f7 agreed draw;

1... c5

The following variations show that with other c-pawn moves White can carry out his winning plan which is to give up his Rook for the c-pawn and push his advanced connected pawns so that eventually one of them will queen. The play is very instructive.

1...c6 2.Rd7+ Kc5 3.Rd1 c3 4.g5 Kc4 5.g6 c2 6.Rc1 Kc3 7.f5 Rg8 8.Kf4 Kd2 9.Rxc2+ Kxc2 10.Kg5 c5 11.f6 c4 12.f7 Rxg6+ 13.Kxg6 c3 14.f8Q +- (Black is one tempo short in gaining a draw in the QvP ending).

1...c3 2.Rxc7 Kd4 3.g5 Kd3 4.f5 c2 5.Rxc2 Kxc2 6.g6+- and again the advanced connected pawns win for White.

2.Rd7+ ...

An important check forcing the Black King into a defensive position.

2... Ke6

2...Kc6 3.Rd1 Kb5 4.g5 c3 5.g6 +-;

3.Rd1! ...

The Rook goes to the 1st rank to tackle the advanced c-pawn.

3... Rb8

4.f5+! ...

Another very important move gaining time over 4.g5? c3 5.Kg4 (5.Rc1 Kf5 6.Rxc3 c4! 7.Rxc4 Rb3+ =) 5...Rb4 6.Re1+ Kf7 7.Kf5 c2 8.Rc1 Rc4 9.g6+ Kg7 10.Kg5 Rc3 =;

4... Ke5

5.Re1+ Kd4

5...Kf6 6.Kf4 c3 7.g5+ Kg7 8.g6 c2 9.Kg5 Rb1 10.f6+ wins;

Again the connected pawns are decisive.

6.g5 c3

7.f6 c2

8.Rc1! ...

8.f7?? Rb1! =;

8... Ke5

8...Kd3 9.f7 Kd2 10.Rxc2+ Kxc2 11.g6 c4 12.g7 Kb2 13.f8=Q Rxf8+ 14.gxf8Q c3 with a theoretical win. Similiar to moves played in the Petrosian-Fischer game but Black is a tempo down in this QvP ending, thus losing rather than drawing.

9.Kg4! ...

The King aids the advance of the pawns.

9... Ke6

10.Rxc2 Kf7

11.Kf5 Rb5

12.g6+ Kg8

13.Rh2! WINS

Black only has a spite check and then the f-pawn, with the help of the White Rook, will advance and queen. A difficult ending but worth the effort to unlock its secrets.

Gens Una Sumus
> > Cumulative competition 

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna- Ukraine

4th

Gerard O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
Pre 16/11/03 Archives

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20/06/04

Position 337

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12/06/04

Position 336

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06/06/04

Position 335

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30/05/04

Position 334

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23/05/04

Position 333

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16/05/04

Position 332

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09/05/04

Position 331

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02/05/04

Position 330

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25/04/04

Position 329

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18/04/04

Position 328

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02/04/04

Position 327

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28/03/04

Position 326

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21/03/04

Position 325

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14/03/04

Position 324

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07/03/04

Position 323

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29/02/04

Position 322

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22/02/04

Position 321

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15/02/04

Position 320

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08/02/04

Position 319

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01/02/04

Position 318

Gligoric

25/01/04

Position 317

Troitzky

18/01/04

Position 316

Szabo

11/01/04

Position 315

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04/01/04

Position 314

Horwitz & Kling

21/12/03

Position 313

Botvinnik

14/12/03

Position 312

Lazard

07/12/03

Position 311

V. Petrov

30/11/03

Position 310

Koranyi

23/11/03

Position 309

Rosselli del Turco

16/11/03

Position 308

Blandford