PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

26/09/2004

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Welcome to this active site. Each week I am going to present to you an endgame position for you to solve or to workout the best continuation. Computer analysis will also be considered. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but all the solutions will be relevant to the practical game. The new position will occur each SUNDAY and I will always be pleased to receive POSITIVE feedback about the positions and the analysis and I will try to acknowledge these where relevant.

Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut, Gerard O'Reilly, Rainer Staudte,

Steven B. Dowd, Christos Gitsis and Valdir Uchoa Jr.
THIS WEEK

POSITION 346

White to play and WIN

 

FORSYTH NOTATION:8/8/8/8/1kpBp3/1N6/1K6/1n6 w - - 0 1:  

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

> > Cumulative competition


LAST WEEK, POSITION 345

Grigory Levenfish, (1889-1961).

A leading Soviet Grandmaster. He played in the Soviet Championships many times, coming equal 1st with Ilya Rabinovich in 1934 and coming clear 1st in 1937 ahead of Konstantinopolsky and Ragozin. In the same year he drew a 13 game match (+5=3-5) with the rising star of Soviet chess, Botvinnik. Levenfish wrote a number of books and collaborated with Smyslov on "The Theory of Rook Endings." Although not without mistakes this book broke new ground and lead to an improved understanding of these difficult endings.

Levenfish vs Freiman,

USSR Championship, 1934

White to play and WIN

FORSYTH NOTATION:3R4/5p2/4b3/3p1k2/2pP1p2/8/3K2PP/8 w - - 0 1:

White has a clear advantage with the exchange for just one pawn. The White Rook is far more mobile than the Black Bishop which is defensively placed. The passed h-pawn will be advanced and will act as a decoy to take away the Bishop from defending the d5 pawn. The candidate pawn will then become the White d4 pawn. We will follow the moves as played in the game except for a couple of moves which were repeated:

1.Rg8! ...

Cutting the Black King off from the passed h-pawn so that it can be quickly advanced.

1... Ke4

1...Kf6 2.h4 Bf5 3.h5 Bh7 4.Rg4 Bf5 5.Rxf4 Kg5 6.g3 Bd3 7.Rh4! Kh6 8.g4 Bh7 9.Rh2 f5 10.gxf5 Bxf5 11.Re2 Bg4 12.Re5 Bf3 13.Ke3 Bh1 14.Kf2 c3 15.Ke3+-;

2.Kc3 Kf5!?

It would have been better to seek counterplay with 2...f3 3.gxf3+ Kxf3 4.h4 Bg4. Black activates the Bishop before pushing the f-pawn. 5.Rg5 Kf4 6.Rxd5 f5 7.Re5 Kg3 8.h5! f4 9.h6 f3 10.h7 f2 11.h8Q f1Q 12.Re3+ White still wins the ending but it is a close call. 13... Kg2 13.Qa8+ Bf3 14.Qxf3+ Qxf3 15.Rxf3 Kxf3 16.d5 +-;

3.h4! Kf6

4.h5 Bf5

5.h6 Bg6

5... Bh7 6.Rg4 Bg6 and White can carry out a beautiful manoeuvre with the Rook: 7. Rh4! Bh7 8.Rh5 Ke6 9.Re5+ and Black's defence crumbles;

White now turns his attention to the d-file and attacking the weak d-pawn.

6.Rd8 Be4

The Bishop is seriously overworked.

7.Rd6+! Kg5

7...Ke7 8.Rxd5! and White wins.

8.h7! Bxh7

The h-pawn has done it's work to decoy the Bishop from defending the d-pawn.

9.Rxd5+ Kg4

10.Re5! f3

11.gxf3+ Kxf3

Nothing can be done about the advance of the d-pawn.

12.d5 Resigns.

12... f6 13.Re7 Bf5 14.d6 and Black is winning easily.

 

A superb ending by Levenfish whose resourceful play and results in the 1930's were approaching world class.

 

 Gens Una Sumus
> > Cumulative competition 

Antonio Senatore, Henryk Kalafut, and Gerard O'Reilly win in July/August

There will be a special prize for the highest placed newcomer in 2004.


The winners of the 2003 cumulative competition:  

1st

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

Alexander Voyna- Ukraine

4th

Gerard O'Reilly - England

  COMPETITIONS for 2004

1. Cumulative 2004 This event will run from 4/1/2004 to 19/12/2004 with a recess in the Summer. Present rules apply but note the book prizes will go to those participants who climb the ladder the greatest number of times during the year. The relative position of the solver's name on the ladder will decide the allocation of prizes.
Pre 16/11/03 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS 
ARCHIVES

19/09/04

Position 344

L. Pachman

12/09/04

Position 343

Makhatadze

05/09/04

Position 342

Capablanca

29/08/04

Position 341

Herbstman

22/08/04

Position 340

Yates

04/07/04

Position 339

Kasparyan

27/06/04

Position 338

Petrosian

20/06/04

Position 337

Chekhover

12/06/04

Position 336

Mecking

06/06/04

Position 335

Tattersall

30/05/04

Position 334

Tartakower

23/05/04

Position 333

Sochniev

16/05/04

Position 332

Polugayevsky

09/05/04

Position 331

Koltanowski

02/05/04

Position 330

Euwe

25/04/04

Position 329

Troizky

18/04/04

Position 328

Em Lasker

02/04/04

Position 327

Kralin

28/03/04

Position 326

Larsen

21/03/04

Position 325

Benko

14/03/04

Position 324

Keres

07/03/04

Position 323

Reti

29/02/04

Position 322

Olafsson

22/02/04

Position 321

Mattison

15/02/04

Position 320

Reshevsky

08/02/04

Position 319

K. A. L. Kubbel

01/02/04

Position 318

Gligoric

25/01/04

Position 317

Troitzky

18/01/04

Position 316

Szabo

11/01/04

Position 315

 V. & M. Platov

04/01/04

Position 314

Horwitz & Kling

21/12/03

Position 313

Botvinnik

14/12/03

Position 312

Lazard

07/12/03

Position 311

V. Petrov

30/11/03

Position 310

Koranyi

23/11/03

Position 309

Rosselli del Turco

16/11/03

Position 308

Blandford