PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


I have decided to add further endings to the site on a monthly basis. The new position will appear at the beginning of each new month. You are invited to solve it. I will be pleased to receive feedback about the positions and the analysis. The solution will be published the following month with the new position. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but they will be relevant to the practical game. The site has over 400 chess endings and endgame studies and and has been running for over seven years. An explanation of the different types of endings is given below. Thanks for your support.

A database of chess endings.
Thanks to Antonio Senatore, Gerard O'Reilly, Josep S. Blanes, Valdir Uchoa Jr, Fernando Rossetti, Rainer Staudte, Pete Bereolos and Sebastion Durier who sent in the correct solution for Position 359.
THIS MONTH

POSITION 360

White to play and WIN

FEN:8/5p2/1Np3p1/8/P2Kbk1p/1P5P/6P1/8 w - - 0 1:

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

Solution for the above plus new position: 1st March 2005.

8X8 Basic Endings for Success

Fischer vs Taimanov

Candidates, 1971

Black to Play

 

Taimanov in this very important match game failed to realize he could have drawn the ending. It was difficult to see because it meant offering the Knight for capture as a diversion for the White King. Taimanov had to get his King to h8 from where it can never be driven away because the Bishop is of the "wrong" colour. This means the h-pawn can never get to the queening square.

1...Nd3! (Taimanov played 1...Ke4? and soon lost) 2.h4 Nf4! 3.Kf5 Kd6! Black gives up the Knight in order to get to h8. 4.Kxf4 Ke7 and the King will arrive at h8. White cannot make progress. If the Knight is not captured the pawn cannot make any progress on the h-file. It will be taken by the Knight. 4.Kf6 Nd5+ 5.Kg5 Nf4! Therefore it is a positional draw.

 


LAST MONTH, POSITION 359

Bernhard Horwitz (1807-1885) & Josef Kling (1811-1876).

Players, Authors and Endgame Composers. Originally from Germany but settled in England in 1846. They formed an important partnership which lead to the writing of Chess Studies (1851). This book made a very big impact on the chess players of the 19th century. It showed that charm and beauty were not only found in direct attacks at the King but also in practical and composed endings. It really marks the beginning of the modern history of the endgame study. It's importance to the student of the endgame cannot be over-emphasised. It really is a wonderful achievement for an age which was only just beginning to get used to the power of steam. The book contains 208 positions covering both the didactic and the more colourful endgame study.

Horwitz & Kling

Chess Studies, 1851

White to play and WIN

:3N4/2p5/8/3q4/3k4/8/3PKP2/R7 w - - 0 1:

White drives the enemy King to the 5th rank where he will set up a fatal Rook pin.

1.Ra4+ Ke5

1...Kc5? 2.Ra5+ Kd6 3.Rxd5+ Kxd5 4.Ke3 c5 5.Nb7 c4 6.Na5+-;

1...Qc4+ 2.Rxc4+ Kxc4 3.Ke3+-;

2.Ra5! ...

The Rook cannot be taken because of a deadly Knight fork:

2...Qxa5 3.Nc6+ Kd5 4.Nxa5 wins;

2... c5

Now a Rook and pawn are sacrificed to set up another Knight fork which cannot be refused.

3.Rxc5! Qxc5

3...Kd4 4.Rxd5+ Kxd5 5.Ke3 wins;

4.d4+! Qxd4

4... Kxd4 5.Ne6+ Kc4 6.Nxc5 Kxc5 7.Ke3 Kd5 8.Kf4 Ke6 9.Kg5 +-;

5.Nc6+ Ke4

6.Nxd4 Kxd4

7.Kf3 Ke5 8.Kg Kf6 9.Kf4 WINS.

Gens Una Sumus
The winners of the 2004 cumulative competition:  

1st =

Antonio Senatore - Argentina,

Gerard O'Reilly - England

2nd

 

Henryk Kalafut - USA,

 

Newcomer Prizes

Rainer Staudte, Valdir Uchoa

I would like to briefly summarise the type of endings found on the site. These are; (a) Basic endings. (b) Practical chess endings. (c) The Endgame study.

All these are interrelated and important and you cannot understand (b) or (c) without a knowledge of (a).

(a) Basic Endings. These are theoretical positions in which we know the correct result with optimum play by both sides. They may consist of three pawns or less and also include all the non-pawn and five piece endings which have now been extensively analysed by computer and of which we have tablebases. In the days when we had adjournments some of these endings could be looked up in text books to give us some idea how to play the position. As we no longer can do this, knowledge and memory of these endings has become important in practical play. Fundamental Chess Endings (2001) by Muller and Lamprecht and Basic Endings (1992) by Balashov and Prandstetter and the earlier A Pocket Guide to Chess Endgames (1970) by David Hooper are good introductions to these endings.

(b) Practical Endings. These occur in over-the-board play where usually more pawns are present. The above ending is an example of this type. Some of these endings are in the process of being transformed to basic endings but often they finish before this stage is reached. Endgame strategy is very different from the middlegame and has its own set of rules and exceptions. Fine's book Basic Chess Endings (1941,2003) recently revised by Pal Benko and Batsford Chess Endings (1993) by Speelman, Tisdall and Wade are about basic and practical endings and both can be recommended.

(c) Endgame Studies. These are positions which have been composed and will contain elements of one or both of the above types of endings. But there are important differences between these types and the study, such as artistic form and economy of construction. An endgame study has to follow strict rules of composition, especially if it is entered into a composing competition. One of these rules states there should only be one solution. If there is an unintended second solution then the study is unsound and said to be "cooked".

Endgame studies are important to the practical player because they enhance his imagination and help him learn and enjoy areas of theory without too much effort.

John Nunn's Endgame Challenge (2002) is an excellent introduction to using endgame studies as a training tool. Walter Korn's American Chess Art (1995) is a basic introduction to the endgame study and a more comprehensive work is John Roycroft's Test Tube Chess (1972).
Pre 18/04/04 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS 
ARCHIVES

16/01/05

Position 358

Przepiorka

19/12/04

Position 357

Keres

12/12/04

Position 356

Matous

05/12/04

Position 355

Taubenhaus

28/11/04

Position 354

Kazantev

21/11/04

Position 353

Geller

14/11/04

Position 352

Somov-Nasimovich

07/11/04

Position 351

Santasiere

31/10/04

Position 350

Kubbel

24/10/04

Position 349

Botvinnik

17/10/04

Position 348

Mattison

10/10/04

Position 347

Marshall

03/10/04

Position 346

Vandecasteele

26/09/04

Position 345

Levenfish

19/09/04

Position 344

L. Pachman

12/09/04

Position 343

Makhatadze

05/09/04

Position 342

Capablanca

29/08/04

Position 341

Herbstman

22/08/04

Position 340

Yates

04/07/04

Position 339

Kasparyan

27/06/04

Position 338

Petrosian

20/06/04

Position 337

Chekhover

12/06/04

Position 336

Mecking

06/06/04

Position 335

Tattersall

30/05/04

Position 334

Tartakower

23/05/04

Position 333

Sochniev

16/05/04

Position 332

Polugayevsky

09/05/04

Position 331

Koltanowski

02/05/04

Position 330

Euwe

25/04/04

Position 329

Troizky

18/04/04

Position 328

Em Lasker