PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*www.chessending.com*

Editor: Brian Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


I have decided to add further endings to the site on a monthly basis. The new position will appear at the beginning of each new month. You are invited to solve it. I will be pleased to receive feedback about the positions and the analysis. The solution will be published the following month with the new position. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but they will be relevant to the practical game. The site has over 400 chess endings and endgame studies and and has been running for over eight years.

A database of chess endings
Thanks to Antonio Senatore and Bill Frost
THIS MONTH

POSITION 373

White to play and WIN

FEN:1K6/8/p2p2B1/3p4/k7/1N2P2p/1P6/8 w - - 0 1:

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

Solution for the above, plus new position: 1st APRIL 2006.


LAST MONTH, POSITION 372

Dr Ossip Bernstein, (1882-1962).

International Grandmaster. Belonged to a group of Russian masters who made their home in France after the Revolution. In his early days he had some impressive results in tournaments and was looked upon as a world class grandmaster. In 1903 he came 2nd in the All-Russian Championship at Kiev and in 1907 shared 1st prize with Rubinstein at Ostend. The previous year he obtained a doctorate in law at Heidelberg and gradually Chess took second place to his professional career where he became a successful financial lawyer. Periodically he would make comebacks to Chess but his best years were behind him although he did have a number of excellent results later in life. In 1933 he drew a training match with Alekhine and even in his 70s he played for France in the Amsterdam Olympiad scoring 50%.

Bernstein vs Rubinstein

Ostende, 1906 

White to play and WIN

FEN:3r2k1/R2r1p1p/6p1/P7/2pB3P/4PP2/3K2P1/8 w - - 0 1:

White has a well placed Bishop which cannot be easily displaced and a powerful passed a-pawn. The White King has easy access to the queenside to help in the advance of the pawn. The Black c-pawn is no real threat.

1.Rxd7 Rxd7

2.Kc3! ...

In the game Bernstein pushed the a-pawn which was a mistake and he could only draw. Black now had time to transfer the Rook to the a-file. 2.a6? Rd6 2.a7 Ra6! 3.Kc3 Ra4 =; The King cannot now advance because of the Black c-pawn and the Rook can stop the advance of the a-pawn from the rear.

2... Rc7

3.a6 Kf8

4.a7 Rc8

The Black Rook will be forced into a passive defending position.

5.Be5! Ra8

The Rook is forced to go into the corner otherwise after Bb8 the pawn will queen.

6.Bb8 Ke7

7.Kxc4 Kd7

8.Kd5+-

White has an easy win. The position with the Rook imprisoned in the corner is worth remembering as it often occurs in practical play.

PRACTICAL CHESS ENDINGS CD

Chess Devon, in collaboration with PCE has produced a CD that includes practically all the endgame positions that have appeared  on this site. This CD contains 363 endgame positions taken from games and studies.  Each position is preceded by a pen portrait of the player or composer.  A built-in programme is provided on the CD to play through the endings.

"PRACTICAL CHESS ENDINGS" is available at £12:50 (including UK postage) from "Chess Devon".

  Order by E-Mail from:bill@frostw170.fsnet.co.uk

Chess Devon: http://www.chessdevon.co.uk (Chess news and games from Devon and the West of England.)

 

SPOTLIGHT

The early editions of PCE'S are available again after many years and include three endings by Capablanca. Checkout the links below. One of these endings is the sensational loss he suffered at the hands of Tarrasch in the 1914 St Petersburg tournament. This is the beginning of a long process of fixing broken links and contructing the early archive.

7/9/97

Position 004

Schlechter

31/8/97

Position 003

Capablanca

24/8/97

Position 002

Tarrasch

17/8/97

Position 001

Capablanca

8X8 Basic Endings for Success
 

 

Black to play and DRAW

 

 

 

 

 

Berger considered this position drawn but he gave the wrong analysis. It was Orrin Frink who discovered the correct way to draw in 1927.

1... Na5! 2.Ke4 [2.Ke5 Kc5 3.Rb2 (3.b7 Nc6+=) 3...Nc4+ Black wins the pawn. 4.Ke4 Nxb6=] 2...Nb7! 3.Ke5 Nc5! 4.Kf5 Nd7 5.b7 Kc7 6.Rb1 Nb8! 7.Ke5 Nc6+ 8.Kd5 Nb8= White cannot make any progress.

 

I would like to briefly summarise the type of endings found on the site. These are; (a) Basic endings. (b) Practical chess endings. (c) The Endgame study.

All these are interrelated and important and you cannot understand (b) or (c) without a knowledge of (a).

(a) Basic Endings. These are theoretical positions in which we know the correct result with optimum play by both sides. They may consist of three pawns or less and also include all the non-pawn and five piece endings which have now been extensively analysed by computer and of which we have tablebases. In the days when we had adjournments some of these endings could be looked up in text books to give us some idea how to play the position. As we no longer can do this, knowledge and memory of these endings has become important in practical play. Fundamental Chess Endings (2001) by Muller and Lamprecht and Basic Endings (1992) by Balashov and Prandstetter and the earlier A Pocket Guide to Chess Endgames (1970) by David Hooper are good introductions to these endings.

(b) Practical Endings. These occur in over-the-board play where usually more pawns are present. The above ending is an example of this type. Some of these endings are in the process of being transformed to basic endings but often they finish before this stage is reached. Endgame strategy is very different from the middlegame and has its own set of rules and exceptions. Fine's book Basic Chess Endings (1941,2003) recently revised by Pal Benko and Batsford Chess Endings (1993) by Speelman, Tisdall and Wade are about basic and practical endings and both can be recommended.

(c) Endgame Studies. These are positions which have been composed and will contain elements of one or both of the above types of endings. But there are important differences between these types and the study, such as artistic form and economy of construction. An endgame study has to follow strict rules of composition, especially if it is entered into a composing competition. One of these rules states there should only be one solution. If there is an unintended second solution then the study is unsound and said to be "cooked".

Endgame studies are important to the practical player because they enhance his imagination and help him learn and enjoy areas of theory without too much effort.

John Nunn's Endgame Challenge (2002) is an excellent introduction to using endgame studies as a training tool. Walter Korn's American Chess Art (1995) is a basic introduction to the endgame study and a more comprehensive work is John Roycroft's Test Tube Chess (1972).
Pre 17/10/04 Archives

mailto: brigosling@aol.com

BRIAN'S CHESS LINKS 
ARCHIVES

01/02/06

Position 371

Ban

01/01/06

Position 370

Em. Lasker

01/12/05

Position 369

Kasparyan

01/11/05

Position 368

Spielmann

01/10/05

Position 367

Beasley

01/09/05

Position 366

Kotov

01/08/05

Position 365

Reti

01/07/05

Position 364

Napier

01/06/05

Position 363

Timman

01/05/05

Position 362

Schlechter

01/04/05

Position 361

Rinck

01/03/05

Position 360

Pillsbury

01/02/05

Position 359

Horwitz & Kling

16/01/05

Position 358

Przepiorka

19/12/04

Position 357

Keres

12/12/04

Position 356

Matous

05/12/04

Position 355

Taubenhaus

28/11/04

Position 354

Kazantev

21/11/04

Position 353

Geller

14/11/04

Position 352

Somov-Nasimovich

07/11/04

Position 351

Santasiere

31/10/04

Position 350

Kubbel

24/10/04

Position 349

Botvinnik

17/10/04

Position 348

Mattison