PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*chessending.com*

Editor: Brian. G. E. Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


The new position will appear at the beginning of each new month. You are invited to solve it. I will be pleased to receive feedback about the positions and the analysis. The solution will be published the following month with the new position. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but they will be relevant to the practical game. The site has over 400 chess endings and endgame studies and and has now reached its 10th year.

A database of chess endings
Thanks to Antonio Senatore
THIS MONTH

POSITION 390

White to play and WIN

:8/p2p1p2/1p3P2/k4Pp1/1p1P4/1p5P/3P2P1/3K4 w - - 0 1:

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

Solution for the above, plus new position: 1st September 2007.


LAST MONTH POSITION 389

Samuel Reshevsky, (1911-1996).

Grandmaster. World Championship Candidate. Born in Poland but he later settled in the USA. At the age of eight he was touring Europe and America giving simultaneous exhibitions against twenty or more players and hardly ever losing. In one such event held at the Illinios Athletic Club in Chicago a crowd of fifteen hundred people turned out to watch this boy who became a legend. The prodigy fulfilled his potential and became a world class player. In 1935 he played in a tournament at Margate and beat the former World Champion, Capablanca, to take 1st place. In the following year he played in the strong Nottingham tournament and came equal 3rd. Position 389 is taken from this tournament. This ending was his only career win against A. Alekhine. 

Alekhine vs Reshevsky

Nottingham, 1936

Black to play and WIN

FEN:8/3n4/2n3pp/1p1kp3/5P1N/4K1P1/1B5P/8 b - - 0 1:

This is one of the great classical endings. It had a special appeal to Reshevesky being his only win against the former World Champion. He had nursed his passed pawn advantage for sometime and now his Knights cooperate to bring home the point. The White Knight is only a spectator and the Bishop is no match for the powerful Black Knights. The threatened promotion of the outside passed b-pawn seals Whites fate.

1... Nb6!

2.Bc1 ...

  2.Bxe5 Nc4+ 3.Kd3 N4xe5+ 4.fxe5 Nxe5+ 5.Kc3 Ke4-+; 

2.Ba1 Nc4+ 3.Kd3 g5 4.fxg5 hxg5 5.Nf5 e4+ 6.Ke2 g4 7.Nh6 Nd4+ 8.Bxd4 Kxd4 9.Nxg4 b4 10.Nf2 Ne3 11.Kd2 b3 12.Kc1 Nc4-+; 

2...Nc4+

3.Kf2 ... 

3.Ke2 Nd4+ 4.Kd1 e4! 5.Nxg6 e3 6.f5 (if 6.Ne5 Ke4-+) 6...Nxf5 7.Nf4+ Ke4 8.Ne2 Kf3 9.Ke1 b4-+; 

3... Nb4!

The Black Knights dominate the board.

4.Ke2 Na2

5.Bd2 ... 

5.Kd1 e4 6.f5 g5 7.Ng2 Nxc1 8.Kxc1 Kd4 9.Kc2 (if 9.f6 Nd6 10.Kd2 h5 11.Kc2 Ke5 12.Kc3 Kxf6-+) 9...h5 10.h3 Nd6 11.g4 hxg4 12.hxg4 Ne8 13.Kd2 Nf6 14.Ne3 b4 15.Nc2+ Kc4 16.Ne3+ Kb3-+;

The powerful passed pawn can now be advanced.

 5... b4

6.fxe5 ... 

6.Nxg6 b3 7.Kd1 Nb2+ 8.Ke2 Nd3 9.Kxd3 e4+ 10.Ke2 b2-+;  

6... b3

7.Kd1 Nxe5!

8.Ng2 ... 

8.Bc1 Nd3 9.Bxh6 Nf2+ 10.Ke1 b2-+; 8.Bxh6 Nc3+ 9.Kd2 b2 10.Kc2 Nc4-+;

 8... Ke4

9.h4 ... 

9.Nf4 Nd3-+;

9.Ba5 Nf3 10.Bd2 g5 11.h4 Kd3-+

9...Nd3!

10.Ba5 ... 

10.Ne3 Nf2+ 11.Ke2 b2-+;

 10...Nb2+

White Resigns.

After 11.Ke2(e1) Nc4 the b-pawn can no longer be stopped from queening. 

My Lil Reminder

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I would like to briefly summarise the type of endings found on the site. These are; (a) Basic endings. (b) Practical chess endings. (c) The Endgame study.

All these are interrelated and important and you cannot understand (b) or (c) without a knowledge of (a).

(a) Basic Endings. These are theoretical positions in which we know the correct result with optimum play by both sides. They may consist of three pawns or less and also include all the non-pawn and five piece endings which have now been extensively analysed by computer and of which we have tablebases. In the days when we had adjournments some of these endings could be looked up in text books to give us some idea how to play the position. As we no longer can do this, knowledge and memory of these endings has become important in practical play. Fundamental Chess Endings (2001) by Muller and Lamprecht and Basic Endings (1992) by Balashov and Prandstetter and the earlier A Pocket Guide to Chess Endgames (1970) by David Hooper are good introductions to these endings.

(b) Practical Endings. These occur in over-the-board play where usually more pawns are present. The above ending is an example of this type. Some of these endings are in the process of being transformed to basic endings but often they finish before this stage is reached. Endgame strategy is very different from the middlegame and has its own set of rules and exceptions. Fine's book Basic Chess Endings (1941,2003) recently revised by Pal Benko and Batsford Chess Endings (1993) by Speelman, Tisdall and Wade are about basic and practical endings and both can be recommended.

(c) Endgame Studies. These are positions which have been composed and will contain elements of one or both of the above types of endings. But there are important differences between these types and the study, such as artistic form and economy of construction. An endgame study has to follow strict rules of composition, especially if it is entered into a composing competition. One of these rules states there should only be one solution. If there is an unintended second solution then the study is unsound and said to be "cooked".

Endgame studies are important to the practical player because they enhance his imagination and help him learn and enjoy areas of theory without too much effort.

John Nunn's Endgame Challenge (2002) is an excellent introduction to using endgame studies as a training tool. Walter Korn's American Chess Art (1995) is a basic introduction to the endgame study and a more comprehensive work is John Roycroft's Test Tube Chess (1972).
Pre 17/10/04 Archives

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01/07/07

Position 388

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01/06/07

Position 387

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01/05/07

Position 386

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03/04/07

Position 385

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01/03/07

Position 384

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01/02/07

Position 383

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01/01/07

Position 382

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01/12/06

Position 381

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01/11/06

Position 380

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01/10/06

Position 379

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01/09/06

Position 378

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Position 377

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01/07/06

Position 376

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01/06/06

Position 375

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01/05/06

Position 374

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01/04/06

Position 373

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01/03/06

Position 372

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01/02/06

Position 371

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01/01/06

Position 370

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01/12/05

Position 369

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01/11/05

Position 368

Spielmann