PRACTICAL CHESS ENDGAME

*chessending.com*

Editor: Brian. G. E. Gosling

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


The new position will appear at the beginning of each new month. You are invited to solve it. I will be pleased to receive feedback about the positions and the analysis. The solution will be published the following month with the new position. Some of these positions will come from actual historical games. Others will be composed endgame studies, but they will be relevant to the practical game. The site has over 400 chess endings and endgame studies and and has now reached its 10th year.

A database of chess endings
Thanks to Antonio Senatore
THIS MONTH

POSITION 398

White to play and WIN

FEN:6k1/K2p4/5Q2/1q3pKp/8/8/P7/8 w - - 0 1:

It is good training to try initially to solve the endings without the assistance of a chess playing programme.

Solution for the above, plus new position: 1st MAY 2008.


LAST MONTH POSITION 397

Josef Moravec, (1882-1969).

Endgame Composer, Problemist and Player. A brilliant first generation Czech composer who had a long and distinguished career. He liked composing mainly Pawn Endings but gained a reputation in producing fine Rook and Pawn studies. He has over 200 endgame studies to his credit. He was a particular favourite of the English writer and player Gerald Abrahams. He was also a noted Problemist and made original contributions to that field of chess.

Ceskoslovensky Sach, 1931

White to Play and Win

 

FEN:6n1/bPB1p3/4Pp1p/1p1p3P/1P1P1P2/8/5K1k/8 w - - 0 1: 

In his endgame studies Moravec liked simple positions with few pieces on the board so this study is not really a true reflection of his style. See the early studies of his we looked at on the website which are examples of his usual style.

The first move is easy to find: White imprisons the Knight

1.f5+ Kh1!

Black sets up a stalemate defence. 1...Kh3? 2.Kf3 Kh4 3.Bf4 Kxh5 4.Kg3 wins;

2.Bf4! Bb8!

Of course the Bishop cannot be taken because of stalemate

2...Bxd4+ 3.Kf3! Ba7 4.Bg3 Bd4 5.Bf2 Kh2 6.Bxd4 Bb8 7.Be3 Kh3 8.Bf4 Ba7 9.Bg3 wins

3.Kg3 ...

This move releases the threat of stalemate and the Black Bishop must move

3... Ba7

4.Be3 Bb8+

5.Kh3 Ba7

5...Bd6 6.Bf2 Bb8 7.Bg3 Ba7 8.Bh2 wins

6.Bf2 Bb8

7.Bg3 Ba7

8.Bh2Wins+

Black is forced to give up his Bishop followed by queening or be mated in a few moves by the new Queen.

"When you are tired of the smallness and pettiness of competitive chess then return to the logic and beauty of the Endgame Study. You will not be disappointed"

My Lil Reminder

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I would like to briefly summarise the type of endings found on the site. These are; (a) Basic endings. (b) Practical chess endings. (c) The Endgame study.

All these are interrelated and important and you cannot understand (b) or (c) without a knowledge of (a).

(a) Basic Endings. These are theoretical positions in which we know the correct result with optimum play by both sides. They may consist of three pawns or less and also include all the non-pawn and five piece endings which have now been extensively analysed by computer and of which we have tablebases. In the days when we had adjournments some of these endings could be looked up in text books to give us some idea how to play the position. As we no longer can do this, knowledge and memory of these endings has become important in practical play. Fundamental Chess Endings (2001) by Muller and Lamprecht and Basic Endings (1992) by Balashov and Prandstetter and the earlier A Pocket Guide to Chess Endgames (1970) by David Hooper are good introductions to these endings.

(b) Practical Endings. These occur in over-the-board play where usually more pawns are present. The above ending is an example of this type. Some of these endings are in the process of being transformed to basic endings but often they finish before this stage is reached. Endgame strategy is very different from the middlegame and has its own set of rules and exceptions. Fine's book Basic Chess Endings (1941,2003) recently revised by Pal Benko and Batsford Chess Endings (1993) by Speelman, Tisdall and Wade are about basic and practical endings and both can be recommended.

(c) Endgame Studies. These are positions which have been composed and will contain elements of one or both of the above types of endings. But there are important differences between these types and the study, such as artistic form and economy of construction. An endgame study has to follow strict rules of composition, especially if it is entered into a composing competition. One of these rules states there should only be one solution. If there is an unintended second solution then the study is unsound and said to be "cooked".

Endgame studies are important to the practical player because they enhance his imagination and help him learn and enjoy areas of theory without too much effort.

John Nunn's Endgame Challenge (2002) is an excellent introduction to using endgame studies as a training tool. Walter Korn's American Chess Art (1995) is a basic introduction to the endgame study and a more comprehensive work is John Roycroft's Test Tube Chess (1972).
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01/02/08

Position 396

Fischer

01/02/08

Position 395

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01/01/08

Position 394

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01/12/07

Position 393

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01/11/07

Position 392

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01/10/07

Position 391

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01/09/07

Position 390

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01/08/07

Position 389

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01/07/07

Position 388

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03/04/07

Position 385

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01/12/06

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01/11/06

Position 380

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Position 378

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01/08/06

Position 377

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Position 376

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01/04/06

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01/03/06

Position 372

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01/02/06

Position 371

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01/01/06

Position 370

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01/12/05

Position 369

Kasparyan

01/11/05

Position 368

Spielmann